Figure 427 An Example of Mapping ColorLime to ColorWhite in VS .NET

Creation Quick Response Code in VS .NET Figure 427 An Example of Mapping ColorLime to ColorWhite
Figure 427 An Example of Mapping ColorLime to ColorWhite
Quick Response Code Encoder In .NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in VS .NET applications.
Notice that in addition to mapping the colors, the sample code uses the Width and Height properties of the Bitmap class The Bitmap class, as well as the Image base class and the Metafile class, provides a great deal of information about the image
Read QR Code JIS X 0510 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Another useful piece of information is the color information at each pixel For example, instead of hard-coding lime as the color, we could use the pixel information of the bitmap itself to pick the color to replace: ColorMap[] colorMap = new ColorMap[1]; colorMap[0] = new ColorMap(); colorMap[0]OldColor = bmpGetPixel(0, bmpHeight - 1); colorMap[0]NewColor = ColorWhite; In this case, we're mapping whatever color is at the bottom left as the pixel to replace In addition to replacing colors, the ImageAttributes object can contain information about remapping palettes, setting gamma correction values, mapping color to grayscale, and other color-related options as well as the wrap mode (as with brushes)
Draw Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Transparency
Reading Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Of course, simply mapping to white or any other color isn't useful if the image needs to be drawn on top of something else that you'd like to show through For this case, there's a special color called Transparent that allows the mapped color to disappear instead of being replaced with another color: ColorMap[] colorMap = new ColorMap[1]; colorMap[0] = new ColorMap(); colorMap[0]OldColor = bmpGetPixel(0, bmpHeight - 1); colorMap[0]NewColor = ColorTransparent; Figure 428 shows the effects of using ColorTransparent
QR Code Encoder In Visual C#
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in VS .NET applications.
Figure 428 Using ColorTransparent in a Color Map
Painting QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in ASP.NET applications.
Again, I used the bottom-left pixel as the color to replace, which is the convention used by other parts of NET In fact, if you're going to always draw a bitmap with a transparent color and if the color to be made transparent is in the bitmap itself in the bottom-left pixel, you can save yourself the trouble of building a color map and instead use the MakeTransparent method: // Make the bottom-left pixel the transparent color bmpMakeTransparent(); gDrawImage(bmp, rect); If the pixel you'd like to use as the transparency color isn't in the bottom left of the bitmap, you can also use the MakeTransparent overload, which takes a color as an argument Calling MakeTransparent actually replaces the pixels of the transparency color with the ColorTransparent value Some raster formats, such as the GIF and Windows icon formats,
Generating Quick Response Code In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in .NET framework applications.
allow you to specify a transparency color value as one of their legal values However, even if the raster format itself doesn't support a transparency color, all Bitmap objects, regardless of the raster format, support the MakeTransparent method
Make Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
Animation
Code 39 Full ASCII Generation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in VS .NET applications.
Just as some raster formats support transparency as a native color, some also support animation One in particular is the GIF format The way that images expose support for animation is by supporting more than one image in a single file GIFs support animation by supporting more than one image in a time dimension, but other formats (such as TIFF files) can support different resolutions or multiple images as pages You can count how many pages are in each "dimension" by calling the GetFrameCount method with FrameDimension objects exposed by properties from the FrameDimension class: // Will throw exceptions if image format doesn't support // multiple images along requested dimension int timeFrames = gifGetFrameCount(FrameDimensionTime); int pageFrames = gifGetFrameCount(FrameDimensionPage); int resolutionFrames = gifGetFrameCount(FrameDimensionResolution); To select which frame to be displayed when the image is drawn is merely a matter of selecting the "active" frame along a dimension: int frame = 4; // Needs to be between 0 and frame count -1 gifSelectActiveFrame(FrameDimensionTime, frame); gDrawImage(gif, thisClientRectangle); In addition to the multiple frames, the GIF format encodes timing information for each frame However, that's where things get tricky Because different image formats support different information, the Image class exposes "extra" information via its GetPropertyItem method The GetPropertyItem method takes a numeric ID and returns a generic PropertyItem object The IDs themselves are defined only in a GDI+ header file and the PropertyItem object's Value property The Value property exposes the actual data as an array of bytes that needs to be interpreted, making usage from NET difficult For example, here's how to get the timings for a GIF file: // Get bytes describing each frame's time delay int PropertyTagFrameDelay = 0x5100; // From GdiPlusImagingh PropertyItem prop = gifGetPropertyItem(PropertyTagFrameDelay); byte[] bytes = propValue; // Convert bytes into an array of time delays int frames = gifGetFrameCount(FrameDimensionTime); int[] delays = new int[frames]; for( int frame = 0; frame != frames; ++frame ) { // Convert each 4-byte chunk into an integer delays[frame] = BitConverterToInt32(bytes, frame * 4); } After you have the time delays, you can start a timer and use the SelectActiveFrame method to do the animation If you do it that way, make sure to convert the delays to milliseconds (1/1000ths of a second), which is what NET timers like, from centiseconds (1/100ths of a second), which is what GIF time delays are specified in Or just use the ImageAnimator helper class, which can do all this for you:
Painting EAN / UCC - 13 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 14 image in .NET framework applications.
// Load animated GIF Bitmap gif = new Bitmap(@"C:\SAMPLE_ANIMATION_COPYGIF"); void AnimationForm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { // Check whether image supports animation if( ImageAnimatorCanAnimate(gif) ) { // Subscribe to event indicating the next frame should be shown ImageAnimatorAnimate(gif, new EventHandler(gif_FrameChanged)); } } void gif_FrameChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) { if( thisInvokeRequired ) { // Transition from worker thread to UI thread thisBeginInvoke( new EventHandler(gif_FrameChanged), new object[] { sender, e }); } else { // Trigger Paint event to draw next frame thisInvalidate(); } } void AnimationForm_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) { // Update image's active frame ImageAnimatorUpdateFrames(gif); // Draw image's current frame Graphics g = eGraphics; gDrawImage(gif, thisClientRectangle); } The ImageAnimator knows how to pull the timing information out of an image and call you back when it's time to show a new one, and that is what calling ImageAnimatorAnimate does When the event is fired, invalidating the rectangle being used to draw the animated GIF triggers the Paint event The Paint event sets the next active frame using the ImageAnimatorUpdateFrames method and draws the active frame Figures 429,430, and 431 show an image being animated
Making GS1 - 12 In .NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in .NET framework applications.
Encoding Leitcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Leitcode image in VS .NET applications.
Recognize GS1 - 13 In .NET
Using Barcode reader for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
UCC - 12 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Java applications.
Barcode Maker In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Maker In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in ASP.NET applications.