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Part I: Introduction to CORBA
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2 An Overview of CORBA
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21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Introduction The Object Management Group Concepts and Terminology CORBA Features Request Invocation General CORBA Application Development Summary
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21 Introduction
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Computer networks typically are heterogeneous For example, the internal network of a small software company might be made up of multiple computing platforms There might be a mainframe that handles transactional database access for order entry, UNIX workstations that supply hardware simulation environments and a software development backbone, personal computers that run Windows and provide desktop office automation tools, and other specialized systems such as network computers, telephony systems, routers, and measurement equipment Small sections of a given network may be homogeneous, but the larger a network is, the more varied and diverse its composition is likely to be There are several reasons for this heterogeneity One obvious reason is that technology changes over time Because networks tend to evolve rather than being built all at once, the best technologies from different time periods end up coexisting on the network In this context, "best" may refer to qualities such as the lowest cost, the highest performance, the least expensive mass storage, the most transactions per minute, the tightest security, the flashiest graphics, or other qualities deemed important at the time of purchase Another reason for network heterogeneity is that one size does not fit all Any given combination of computer, operating system, and networking platform will work best for only a subset of the computing activities performed within a network Still another reason is that diversity within a network can make it more resilient because any problems in a given machine type, operating system, or application are unlikely to affect other networked systems running different operating systems and applications The factors that lead to heterogeneous computer networks are largely inevitable; thus, developers of practical distributed systems, whether they like it or not, must cope with heterogeneity Whereas developing software for any distributed system is difficult, developing software for a heterogeneous distributed system sometimes borders on the impossible Such software must deal with all the problems normally encountered in distributed systems programming, such as the failure of some of the systems in the network, partitioning of the network, problems associated with resource contention and sharing, and security-related risks If you add heterogeneity to the picture, some of these problems become more acute, and new ones crop up
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For example, problems you encounter while porting a networked application for use on a new platform in the network may result in two or more versions of the same application If you make any changes to any version of the application, you must go back and modify all the other versions appropriately and then test them individually and in their various combinations to make sure they all work properly The degree of difficulty presented by this situation increases dramatically as the number of different platforms in the network rises Keep in mind that heterogeneity in this context does not refer only to computing hardware and operating systems Writing a robust distributed application from top to bottom for example, from a custom graphical user interface all the way down to the network transports and protocols is tremendously difficult for almost any real-world application because of the overwhelming complexity and the number of details involved As a result, developers of distributed applications tend to make heavy use of tools and libraries This means that distributed applications are themselves heterogeneous, often glued together from a number of layered applications and libraries Unfortunately, in many cases, as the distributed system grows, the chance decreases dramatically that all the applications and libraries that compose it were actually designed to work together At a very general level, you can tackle the problem of developing applications for heterogeneous distributed systems by following two key rules Find platform-independent models and abstractions that you can apply to help solve a wide variety of problems Hide as much low-level complexity as possible without sacrificing too much performance These rules are general enough to be used to develop any portable application whether or not it is distributed However, the additional complexities introduced by distribution make each rule carry more weight Using the right abstractions and models can essentially provide a new homogeneous application development layer over the top of all the distributed heterogeneous complexity This layer hides low-level details and allows application developers to solve their immediate problems without having to first solve the low-level networking details for all the diverse computing platforms used by their applications The CORBA specification, written and maintained by the OMG, supplies a balanced set of flexible abstractions and concrete services needed to realize practical solutions for the problems associated with distributed heterogeneous computing After describing the OMG and CORBA, the remainder of this chapter provides a high-level overview of the computing model, the components, and the important concepts of CORBA
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