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The focus for most intrusion detection efforts has been the gateway to the Internet By watching strategic choke points, typically delineated by firewalls, analysts keep an eye on traffic entering the enterprise This mode of operation naturally follows from the process of deploying firewalls in the 1990s When organizations realized their firewalls were not and could not keep attackers at bay, they positioned IDSs to monitor traffic passing through their preventative devices A more recent development involves watching traffic leaving the enterprise As this book has shown, strict attention to inbound traffic ignores half the picture In many cases, watching outbound traffic is easier than monitoring inbound traffic It is tedious to log and inspect thousands of inbound attempts to exploit Microsoft SQL servers It is simple to detect and validate one or two outbound events of the same kind Watching the inbound traffic is first-order intrusion detection Watching the outbound response to an attack is second-order intrusion detection At this point we know analysts continue to watch attacks from the Internet, and they are becoming more aware of attacks launched from their sites against remote hosts The next arena for detection concentrates on attacks launched within the enterprise against internal systems This sort of traffic is the result of several scenarios The most basic scenarios see a curious or disgruntled employee attacking internal systems for fun or profit The difficulty here is the size and topology of the internal network and the switched, high-bandwidth links used to connect internal users Organizations find it difficult enough to consolidate their Internet points of presence into a manageable, watchable set Sprawling internal networks without boundaries offer few obvious choices for deploying sensors Furthermore, the techniques used to attack internal hosts are much different than those used by outsiders A rogue employee is not going to run Nmap and launch a Windows exploit He or she will log in to the target with valid or stolen credentials and copy information via SMB share Because this traffic looks like any one of a million other legitimate business transactions, it is exceedingly difficult to monitor internal traffic Network-based approaches do not apply well to internal threat models Host-based detection, with policies to monitor or limit user's actions, is more effective Engineers tasked to deploy IDSs inside their enterprise boundaries should carefully consider their threat model Rather than treat the inside of the organization as another point of Internet presence, engineers should take a host- and policy-centric look at watching for unauthorized activity Inspecting network traffic will probably not be the answer Moving outside the enterprise, the next area of concern is the network infrastructure connecting the organization to the Internet Devices like border routers are usually not within the view of network IDSs This means the most fundamental component of Internet-based operations is subject to attack while no one is watching Routers and switches are computers They run operating systems and applications vulnerable to subversion, abuse, or breach The ubiquity of Web-based management and its attendant vulnerabilities is bringing this fact home to network administrators The Cisco IOS HTTP authentication vulnerability of 2001 was one of the industry's first wake-up calls in this respect
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Network infrastructure is just as likely to be attacked as Web, e-mail, or DNS servers Engineers should consider observation of traffic to routers when implementing NSM operations In cases where independent observation is not possible, routers should export NetFlow or other session records to centralized collection platforms Analysts can then interpret these session records for signs of unusual activity System logs from all network devices should similarly be collected for centralized analysis and storage Remember that it is not necessary to inspect every bit of information recorded by a monitoring application Simply storing that data for future use is incredibly valuable In the event an incident is detected using formalized NSM processes, it's helpful to search a central repository of archived router, switch, and firewall logs The bandwidth and hard drive space consumed by the collection and storage processes will be well worth it if clues to an intruder's methodology, reach, and intentions are unearthed In addition to the wired network, organizations have spent millions on rolling out wireless
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