Coroutines in .NET framework

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Coroutines
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Normally, functions operate on a single set of input arguments However, a function can also be written to operate as a task that processes a sequence of inputs sent to itThis type of function is known as a coroutine and is created by using the yield statement as an expression (yield) as shown in this example:
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def print_matches(matchtext): print "Looking for", matchtext while True: line = (yield) # Get a line of text if matchtext in line: print line
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To use this function, you first call it, advance it to the first (yield), and then start sending data to it using send() For example:
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>>> matcher = print_matches("python") >>> matchernext() # Advance to the first (yield) Looking for python >>> matchersend("Hello World") >>> matchersend("python is cool") python is cool >>> matchersend("yow!") >>> matcherclose() # Done with the matcher function call >>>
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A coroutine is suspended until a value is sent to it using send()When this happens, that value is returned by the (yield) expression inside the coroutine and is processed by the statements that follow Processing continues until the next (yield) expression is encountered at which point the function suspendsThis continues until the coroutine function returns or close() is called on it as shown in the previous example Coroutines are useful when writing concurrent programs based on producerconsumer problems where one part of a program is producing data to be consumed by another part of the program In this model, a coroutine represents a consumer of data Here is an example of using generators and coroutines together:
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# A set of matcher coroutines matchers = [ print_matches("python"), print_matches("guido"), print_matches("jython") ]
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Objects and Classes
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# Prep all of the matchers by calling next() for m in matchers: mnext() # Feed an active log file into all matchers Note for this to work, # a web server must be actively writing data to the log wwwlog = tail(open("access-log")) for line in wwwlog: for m in matchers: msend(line) # Send data into each matcher coroutine
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Further details about coroutines can be found in 6
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Objects and Classes
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All values used in a program are objects An object consists of internal data and methods that perform various kinds of operations involving that dataYou have already used objects and methods when working with the built-in types such as strings and lists For example:
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items = [37, 42] itemsappend(73) # Create a list object # Call the append() method
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The dir() function lists the methods available on an object and is a useful tool for interactive experimentation For example:
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>>> items = [37, 42] >>> dir(items) ['_ _add_ _', '_ _class_ _', '_ _contains_ _', '_ _delattr_ _', '_ _delitem_ _', 'append', 'count', 'extend', 'index', 'insert', 'pop', 'remove', 'reverse', 'sort'] >>>
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When inspecting objects, you will see familiar methods such as append() and insert() listed However, you will also see special methods that always begin and end with a double underscoreThese methods implement various language operations For example, the _ _add_ _() method implements the + operator:
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>>> items_ _add_ _([73,101]) [37, 42, 73, 101] >>>
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The class statement is used to define new types of objects and for object-oriented programming For example, the following class defines a simple stack with push(), pop(), and length() operations:
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class Stack(object): def _ _init_ _(self): selfstack = [ ] def push(self,object): selfstackappend(object) def pop(self): return selfstackpop() def length(self): return len(selfstack) # Initialize the stack
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In the first line of the class definition, the statement class Stack(object) declares Stack to be an objectThe use of parentheses is how Python specifies inheritance in this case, Stack inherits from object, which is the root of all Python types Inside the class definition, methods are defined using the def statementThe first argument in each
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1
A Tutorial Introduction
method always refers to the object itself By convention, self is the name used for this argument All operations involving the attributes of an object must explicitly refer to the self variable Methods with leading and trailing double underscores are special methods For example, _ _init_ _ is used to initialize an object after it s created To use a class, write code such as the following:
s = Stack() spush("Dave") spush(42) spush([3,4,5]) x = spop() y = spop() del s # Create a stack # Push some things onto it