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x:param: Provides a parameter to the transformation performed by an x:transform
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tag Parameter Dynamic Required
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name
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Description The name of the parameter
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x:param: Provides a parameter to the transformation performed by an x:transform
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tag Parameter Dynamic Required
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value
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Description The value of the parameter; if not provided as an attribute, the body content will be used
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Body: If the value is not provided as an attribute, the body content will be used as the value
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Appendix B Configuring a Web Application
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JavaServer Pages do not exist in a vacuum At the very least, they will need access to numerous Java classes representing beans and the implementations of tag libraries In addition, in any site of realistic complexity, JSPs will coexist with a set of servlets and filters and will need access to various other resources Of course, some files will be needed to configure all this All these pieces together comprise a Web application, and the exact layout of such applications is defined as part of the J2EE specification Standardizing on such a format has numerous advantages It makes it possible to develop under one application server, such as Tomcat, and to deploy under something commercially supported It also makes it possible to package Web applications as single files called war (Web application resource) files that can be sold or otherwise distributed without needing to support hundreds of deployment scenarios
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B1 Layout of the Directories
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All the JSP files live in the top level of the Web application It is also possible to create arbitrary subdirectories for JSPs, and these are accessed as URLs in the obvious way All the other elements of the application are in a special directory: WEB-INF Within this directory is the master configuration file, webxml, which will be examined in the next section Java code libraries J AR (Java Archive) f iles are placed in the WEB-INF/lib directory This automatically adds these JAR files to the CLASSPATH for the application There are no subdirectories under lib Code specific to the Web application may be placed in a JAR file, which is then installed in WEB-INF/lib, or in WEB-INF/classes This directory is added to the effective CLASSPATH; within it, code is laid out according to the usual Java rules For example, the class comawljspch08CdBean would be found in
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WEB-INF/classes/com/awl/jspbook/ch08/CdBeanclass It is up to the developer
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whether to leave the Java source files within these directories or to compile them elsewhere and move the resulting class files It is also common to store resources, such as property files, resource bundles, and serialized beans, in the CLASSPATH These resources may therefore also be placed in JAR files or under WEB-INF/classes Finally, by convention, is a special directory for tag library descriptors: WEB-INF/taglibs This convention is not enforced, as the location of TLD files is specified in webxml; in general, it is good practice to put them all in one place Once the application has been laid out according to these rules, it can be packaged into a war file, with the following command:
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jar -c0f /application_namewar
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Here, application_name can be replaced with the chosen name for the application In many application servers, such as Tomcat, it is possible to deploy an application by simply placing the war file in the proper directory For Tomcat, the directory is called webapps under the Tomcat home directory
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B2 The Webxml File
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The webxml file controls everything specific to the current Web applications Typically, one or more files configure the application server as a whole; this vendor-specific file is not defined as part of the J2EE specification As with any good XML document (see 8), webxml starts with a declaration, DTD reference, and root node The top level looks like this:
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< xml version="10" encoding="ISO-8859-1" > <!DOCTYPE web-app PUBLIC "-//Sun Microsystems, Inc//DTD Web Application 23//EN" "http://javasuncom/dtd/web-app_2_3dtd">
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<web-app> </web-app>
The real meat is found within the web-app tags and consists of the following elements in order
1 An optional icon to be used by interactive configuration or maintenance applications This can specify small (16 x 16) and large (32 x 32) images, which should live within the main directory of the Web application Example:
<icon> <large-icon>images/jspbook_largejpg</large-icon> <small-icon>images/jspbook_smalljpg</small-icon> </icon>
2 An optional display name, which can also be used by administration tools Example: