The Sample Projects in Java

Generator Quick Response Code in Java The Sample Projects
22 The Sample Projects
Painting QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create QR image in Java applications.
bpmngmfgraphh
Make Barcode In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
scerarioecore
Decoding Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
scenariogmfmap
Denso QR Bar Code Generation In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in .NET framework applications.
M commonecore (TPTP)
Printing QR In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in ASP.NET applications.
M requirementsecore
Create QR-Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET applications.
scenario2testsulteqvto
QR Code Generation In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in .NET framework applications.
Figure 2-7
Paint Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
Scenario DSL artifacts
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Creator In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Java applications.
dncencore
Generate Data Matrix 2d Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Java applications.
oocoreencore
Encoding UPCA In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Java applications.
dncgmfmap
Encode Code 39 Extended In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Java applications.
javaecore M M M T M T M T M T
Create USPS Confirm Service Barcode In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create USPS PLANET Barcode image in Java applications.
dnc2jeeqvto
Scan Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
jem2javaxpt
EAN 128 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in ASP.NET applications.
dnc2javaxpt
Code39 Encoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in ASP.NET applications.
NodeEditPartxpt*
Paint Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
Classjavajet*
Data Matrix Creator In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
Figure 2-8
Recognizing Code128 In VS .NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Color modeling DSL artifacts
EAN13 Reader In VS .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Extending this set of sample projects involves many possibilities, such as producing BPEL from BPMN-based scenario diagrams, transforming business domain and scenario diagrams to and from their UML counterparts, transforming scenarios to Eclipse cheat sheets, extending the mindmap to display task information with a diagram better suited for temporal display (such as a Gantt chart), synchronizing tasks in mindmaps with Bugzilla entries using an M2M, and so on All of these come to mind as feasible options using familiar techniques and a common metamodel by leveraging the Modeling project for DSL and model-driven software-development techniques Of course, these extensions are left as exercises for the reader Figures 2-9 through 2-11 illustrate sample application artifacts and how they relate, using the notation introduced earlier From the Practitioner s perspective, mindmap, scenario, and business models are created and viewed with corresponding diagrams The requirements model can be produced from a mindmap model and edited with a diagram and corresponding editor The mindmap and requirements models can produce reports using M2M and M2T transformations
CHAPTER 2 Modeling Project as a DSL Toolkit
#proj a, b, c x, y, z, samplecsv
samplemmd
mindmap2csv
samplemindmap
samplehtml
<html> </html>
mindmap2xhtml
<html> </html> samplehtml
mindmap2requirements
requirements2html samplerequirements
Figure 2-9
Mindmap and requirements DSL instances
samplerequirements samplescenario
scenario2testsuite
sampletestsuite
Figure 2-10
Scenario DSL instance
samplednc
M samplejem
M java
class { { *java
dnc2jee
class { { *java
dnc2java
Figure 2-11
Color modeling and Java DSL instances
22 The Sample Projects
A scenario model is transformed into a TPTP Manual Test model, for use in its editor Scenario models can also be embedded within requirements models The business model is transformed first to a Java EMF Model (JEM) and then to text as Java class files Alternatively, the business model is transformed directly to Java classes using Xpand templates Figure 2-12 shows a Practitioner s workspace with each of the artifacts represented The four open diagrams in the editor are the mindmap in the upper left, the scenario in the upper right, the requirements in the lower left, and the color modeling diagram in the lower right The outline view shows the content of the requirements editor, which is also visible using the Selection page in the editor itself
Figure 2-12
Practitioner s view of sample projects
The workspace has two projects, with the second being the target of the Java code generation from the color model instance The main project contains all the Practitioner models and generated artifacts, other than Java The mindmap CSV output, requirements HTML report, mindmap XHTML report, intermediate JEM, and TPTP test suite are all found in the orgeclipseexample project Also seen is a typesxmi file used by the color business domain model
CHAPTER 2 Modeling Project as a DSL Toolkit
23 Summary
In this chapter, we introduced a fictitious set of DSL-based projects that are used in the context of a product line for examples to follow As you will see, maximizing the use of models and model-based technologies for a product line can lead to increased productivity and enable customization options not found in traditional methods of product development
PART 1I
Developing Domain-Specific Languages
This part of the book takes the reader through a series of tutorial-like steps of developing a product line using domain-specific languages From abstract syntax developed using Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF), to graphical concrete syntax developed using Graphical Modeling Framework (GMF), to model-to-model transformation using Query/View/ Transformation (QVT), to model-to-text transformation using Xpand, each technology is illustrated using a series of sample projects At the end, we present a chapter that focuses on deploying the samples
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Developing a DSL Abstract Syntax
In this chapter, we walk through the development of a domain-specific language (DSL) using the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF) and supporting components Specifically, we develop the DSL s abstract syntax using the Ecore metamodel But first we cover some basics on what to consider when creating a DSL and the different implementation strategies you might want to employ when using EMF Next, we provide an overview of EMF, leaving detailed information to the book [38] dedicated to this purpose We cover some additional components of EMF and Model Development Tools (MDT) that enable you to further refine DSLs, and we develop a series of domain models for use in the sample projects