RMI is not exclusive to J2EE However, RMI is at the heart of some J2EE technologies, such as EJB in Java

Drawing Denso QR Bar Code in Java RMI is not exclusive to J2EE However, RMI is at the heart of some J2EE technologies, such as EJB
RMI is not exclusive to J2EE However, RMI is at the heart of some J2EE technologies, such as EJB
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Other J2EE Technologies and APIs
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In this section, we list some other J2EE technologies and APIs that are either in existence now or are expected to become part of J2EE in the future
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J2EE Connectors
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J2EE Connectors provide a common architecture to use when dealing with Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) as the data store These large systems tend to be prevalent in huge enterprises, and they can be very complex to deal with
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Java Transaction API (JTA)
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A transaction refers to a grouping of multiple operations into a single "atomic" operation Thus, if part of a transaction fails, the other, previously executed operations are "rolled back," that is, undone, to ensure sanity of the system
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The JTA provides a generic, high-level API for transaction management It is primarily used for large, distributed, often complex transaction processing, usually involving a number of large, remotely connected systems
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Java IDL
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The Java Interface Definition Language (IDL) provides interoperability support for the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and the industry standard Internet Inter-Orb Protocol (IIOP) It includes an IDL-to-Java compiler and a lightweight Object Request Broker (ORB)
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RMI-IIOP
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RMI-IIOP refers to RMI using the IIOP as the communication protocol under the covers IIOP is an Object Management Group (OMG) standard Because CORBA uses IIOP as the underlying protocol, the use of RMI-IIOP makes interoperability between RMI and CORBA objects simpler RMI-IIOP is typically also more efficient than RMI over the Java Remote Method Protocol (JRMP)
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Java Transaction Service (JTS)
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JTS is a transaction manager service that supports JTA and makes use of IIOP to communicate between remote instances of the service Like JTA, it is used in large d istributed system situations
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JavaMail
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JavaMail provides an API to facilitate interaction with e-mail messaging systems in a vendor independent fashion This API consists primarily of a set of abstract classes that model a Java-based e -mail system It is intended for building sophisticated e -mail-based applications
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Note, however, that it is possible to provide e -mail support in an application without using the JavaMail API
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Summary
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J2EE offers a well thought-out architecture for developing complex enterprise Java applications
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J2EE's combination of technologies namely EJB, servlets, and JSPs and its generic API (JDBC, JavaMail, JMS, etc) give its users various advantages Thus, developing a J2EE application simplifies the overall task of developing large-scale distributed applications
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Some of the key challenges that are simplified by J2EE include distribution of applications across multiple processes and processors, security, transactions, persistence management, and deployment
3 Introduction to the UML
UML Overview Why Use the J2EE and the UML Together Challenges in Modeling J2EE in the UML Extension Mechanisms in the U M L The Approach to J2EE UML Modeling Summary
The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a graphical language for the modeling and development of software systems It provides modeling and visualization support for all phases of software development, from requirements analysis to specification, to construction and deployment
The UML has its roots in several preceding object-oriented notations[1] The most prominent among them being the notations popularized by Booch, Rumbaugh, et al and Jacobson, et al So, even though the UML has been formalized for just a few years, its predecessors have been used to design and specify software-intensive systems since the early 1990s
The distinction between notation and methodology is a common source of confusion The
UML is a notation that can be applied using many different approaches These approaches are the methodologies The unification of the competing notations came about in the mid to late 1990s In early 1997, several consortia submitted responses to an Object Management Group (OMG) Request for Proposal for a common metamodel to describe software-intensive systems A consortium headed by Rational Software submitted the UML 10 specification This incorporated the leading features of several modeling notations including those of Booch, Rumbaugh, and Jacobson At the request of the OMG, most of the competing consortia cooperated with the group led by Rational to refine UML 10 into UML 11, which was accepted by the OMG in late 1997
UML continues to evolve under the direction of the OMG For example, recently proposed extensions provide common notations for data modeling, Web application modeling, and mapping J2EE constructs to UML
The UML has broad industry support By virtue of being the specification supported by the 850+ member OMG, it is the de jure software industry standard for visual modeling and development The fact that all leading tools for modeling software-intensive systems now support UML makes it the de facto standard as well