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Understanding Active Directory sites Exploring the necessity of sites Examining site components Understanding the bridgehead server Considering the final site planning steps
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An Active Directory site is a physical grouping of computers. A site, by definition, encompasses a certain geographic location in which all computers reside on one or more well-connected subnets. In reality, a site can be one specific geographic place, or it can span several geographic locations. The key to understanding sites in the Active Directory is to see sites in the same way the Active Directory sees them in terms of connectivity. The Active Directory expects your sites to be based on wellconnected TCP/IP subnets. The term well-connected is a soft term in that it does not mean one specific thing. Typically, a well-connected subnet has fast, reliable, inexpensive, and abundant bandwidth, such as in typical LAN connectivity. How you define well-connected will vary from one Active Directory planner to the next, but the key point and it is a very important one is to understand that the Active Directory always assumes a site has fast, reliable, inexpensive, and abundant bandwidth. In short, if your view of site definition is different from how the Active Directory sees sites, be sure to get on board with the Active Directory s definition before planning your own sites.
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Part I Planning an Active Directory Deployment
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When a site is established, the Active Directory assumes that bandwidth is readily available, reliable, inexpensive, and fast. Because the Active Directory assumes these qualities, it plans replication traffic within the site based on these well-connected features. So, it is important that you build your sites based on the Active Directory s definition of a site.
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You can learn all about intrasite and intersite replication in 13.
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A site is physical grouping of computers based on TCP/IP connectivity, and a domain is a logical grouping of users, computers, and other Active Directory objects based on administrative and security needs. It is very important to keep the definitions and uses of domains and sites straight as you plan your own deployment. In previous planning chapters, you have learned that Active Directory domains are virtually unlimited in size and scope. You can have smaller domains as you did in NT networks, or you can have a single domain encompass an entire network. The decision is based on security and administrative focus. With that said, constantly keep in mind that domains and sites are not interconnected. Several domains can exist within a single site, or a single domain can span several sites. The domain structure is the logical view of your network while the site structure is the physical view of your network. To solidify this concept, consider an example. Triton, Inc., has three domains: a root domain of triton.com and two child domains of prod.triton.com and dev.triton.com. The domain structure provides the logical view of the network. Each child domain is independently managed, and each child has its own security and administrative procedures, as shown in Figure 5-1. In reality, Triton, Inc. s, domains span several cities and two continents, as you can see in Figure 5-2. As you can see, triton.com and dev.triton.com each reside in a site while prod. triton.com, a single domain, resides in two different sites. As you are thinking about planning sites, it is important to keep sites and domains clear in your mind. This may seem like a simple task, but as you are planning an Active Directory design and deployment, issues such as these can become tricky and confusing. The following bullet list summarizes the differences between sites and domains: A domain is a logical grouping of users, computers, and other objects that function as an administrative and security boundary.
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