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push dword oldtime call localtime add esp, byte 4
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; Push address of calendar time value ; Returns pointer to static time structure in eax ; Clean up stack after call
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Here, oldtime is a time_t value Given this value, localtime returns in EAX-much in the fashion of ctime-a pointer to a tm structure within the runtime library somewhere By using this pointer as a base address, you can access the fields in the structure by using a constant displacement from the base (here, shown as stored in EAX): mov edx, dword [eax+20] push edx push dword yrmsg call printf add esp, byte 8 ; ; ; ; ; Year value is 20 bytes offset into tm Push value onto the stack Push address of the base string Display string and year value with printf Clean up the stack
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By using the displacements shown in Table 133, you can access all the other components of the time and the date in the tm structure, stored as 32-bit integer values
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Uninitialized Storage and [bss]
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To newcomers, the difference between the [data] and [bss] sections of the program may be obscure Both are used for holding variables so, what's the deal Is it (like many other things in computing) just more, um, bss Not really Again, the difference is more a matter of convention than anything else The [data] section was intended to contain initialized data; that is, variables that you provide with initial values Most of the time, these will be base strings for data display containing prompts and other string data that doesn't change during the course of a program's execution Sometimes you'll store count values there that define the number of lines in an output report, and so on These values are much like values defined as CONSTANT in Pascal They're defined at compile time and are not supposed to change In assembly, of course, you can change them if you want But for variables that begin without values (that is, are uninitialized) which are given values over the course of a program's execution (which is the way most high-level language programmers think of variables), you should probably allocate them in the [bss] section There are two groups of data-definition pseudoinstructions that I've used informally all along They are what I call the defines and the reserves The define pseudoinstructions give a name, a size, and a value to a data item The reserves only give a name and a size Here are some examples: rowcount dd 6 fileop db 'w',0 timemsg db "Hey, what time is it It's %s",10,0 timediff resd 1 ; Reserve 1 integer (4 bytes) for time difference timestr resb 40 ; Reserve 40 bytes for time string tmcopy resd 9 ; Reserve 9 integer fields for time struct tm The first group are the defines The ones you'll use most often are DD (define double) and DB (define byte) The DB pseudoinstruction is unique in that it allows you to define character arrays very easily, and it is generally used for string constants For more advanced work, NASM provides you with DW (define word) for 16-bit quantities, DQ (define quad word) for 64-byte quantities, and DT (define ten-byte) for 80-bit quantities These larger types are used for floating-point arithmetic, which I won't be covering in this book The second group are reserves They all begin with "RES," followed by the code that indicates the size of the item to be reserved NASM defines RESB, RESW, RESD, RESQ, and REST for bytes, words, doubles, quads, and 10-bytes The reserves allow you to allocate arrays of any type, by specifying an integer constant after the pseudoinstruction RESB 40 allocates 40 bytes, and RESD 9 allocates 9 doubles (32-bit quantities) all in a contiguous array
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