XML-RPC in .NET framework

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XML-RPC was developed by Dave Winer and others at UserLand,[13] an Internet publishing company looking for a more efficient way of transferring XML documents across the Web and developing interactive Web sites XML-RPC is a very simple and straightforward definition of remote procedure call semantics in XML As with SOAP, an XML-RPC message is carried as an HTTP POST request, and the response is carried as a normal HTTP response The XML-RPC syntax represents a simple mapping to the RPC method and argument name format and is relatively uncomplicated compared to SOAP, without headers, complex serialization formats, or abstractions suitable for document-oriented interaction The XML-RPC specification simply requires that the XML message carried in the HTTP POST be mapped onto a procedure execution at the target host and that the remote procedure be executed; the XML message then returns its results on the HTTP response message Procedure arguments can be formatted using simple data types, such as scalars, numbers, strings, and dates or can use complex record and list structures For example:
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See Programming Web Services with XML-RPC (St Laurent, Dumbill, and Johnston, 2001)
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XML-RPC: More Real Than SOAP
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XML-RPC is much simpler than SOAP and, without WSDL and associated specifications, much easier to understand More than 30 implementations of XML-RPC are in use It's a bit like the RosettaNet versus ebXML issue; one is real, implemented, and used within its world, but the other holds greater promise
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POST /RPC2 HTTP/10 User-Agent: Frontier/512 (WinNT) Host: bettyuserlandcom
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Understanding Web Services- XML, WSDL, SOAP and UDDI
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Content-Type: text/xml Content-length: 181 < xml version="10" > <methodCall> <methodName>examplesgetStateName</methodName>
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<params>
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<param>
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<value><i4>41</i4></value>
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</param>
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</params>
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</methodCall>
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The URI in the HTTP header shown in the example includes /RPC2, which can be used to tell the server to route the request to the RPC2 responder, thereby bypassing the Web server, or going straight to the RPC mapper The message payload, which is a simple XML document, is contained using a top-level <methodCall> element The <methodCall> element contains a simple <methodName> element to identify the procedure to call and a <params> element to contain the data for the procedure arguments XML-RPC messages map to methods
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XML-RPC does not define how to map the <methodName> to an actual method or procedure; that's up to the implementation As long as an implementation is capable of accepting an XML RPC message, mapping it to a procedure or method, and returning the result correctly formatted as an XML-RPC response, the remainder of the details can be implementation specific The methodName could be the name of a file containing a script that executes on an incoming request, the name of a cell in a database table, or a path to a file contained within a hierarchy of folders and files For example:
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HTTP/11 200 OK Connection: close Content-Length: 158 Content-Type: text/xml Date: Fri, 17 Jul 1998 19:55:08 GMT Server: UserLand Frontier/512-WinNT < xml version="10" > <methodResponse> <params> <param> <value><string>South Dakota</string></value> </param> </params>
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</methodResponse>
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The example illustrates the response to an XML-RPC message As in SOAP, the HTTP 200 OK in the response message indicates success
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Understanding Web Services- XML, WSDL, SOAP and UDDI
If any kind of error occurred in executing the procedure or handling the message, the response must contain a <fault> element to identify the problem The body of a response can contain either a <params> element or the <fault> element but not both For example:
HTTP/11 200 OK Connection: close Content-Length: 426 Content-Type: text/xml Date: Fri, 17 Jul 1998 19:55:02 GMT Server: UserLand Frontier/512-WinNT < xml version="10" > <methodResponse> <fault>
<value>
<struct>
<member>
<name>faultCode</name>
<value><int>4</int></value>
</member> <member>
<name>faultString</name>
<value><string>
Too many parameters </string></value> </member> </struct> </value> </fault> </methodResponse>
The example illustrates a possible fault message response This type of error reflects an application-level error rather than a protocol-level error, which would be returned as an HTTP error 400 or 500 Note the use of embedded XML elements for a data type definintion
Summary
Many additional technologies are needed to complement the core Web services specifications for use in complex and demanding business applications To be viable, Web services specifications need security, process flow, transactions, messaging improvements, and other qualities of service A reference architecture for additional Web services technologies is needed to guide the development of these additional technologies with respect to clearly defining what's needed and what isn't and how additional technologies interact with one another and with the core specifications Efforts are under way to define security standards to protect document confidentiality and integrity and to create mechanisms to control who is allowed to access which Web service interfaces Sample specifications and proposals are available on the Internet for security technologies, reference architectures, process flow, transaction coordination, message routing, and reliable messaging A combination of these and perhaps other, as yet undefined, specifications will emerge to provide the next layer of functionality for Web services technologies, making them suitable for more and more types of mission-critical applications Some sense of where Web services came from and where they are going can be gleaned from studying RosettaNet and XML RPC, two widely used technologies that predate Web services