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O'Reilly Network Safari Bookshelf Jini Specifications, The, Second Edition Unfortunately, providing a service is only part of what is needed to be a Jini technology enabled service To be part of a system of Jini technology enabled services and/or devices, a service must also be able to participate in the Jini discovery protocol and register itself into the local Jini lookup service This is how a service makes itself known to the djinn, and how the service is accessed by other members of the djinn These two requirements are intimately connected The major goal of the Jini discovery protocol is to allow a device or service to obtain a Java Remote Method Invocation (RMI) reference to the local Jini lookup service Once this reference has been obtained, the service needs to register itself in that Jini lookup service, allowing other participants in the djinn to find and use the service The interface to the Jini lookup service is a full RMI interface, and the implementation of that service uses all of the mechanisms of RMI, including the distributed garbage collection and the dynamic downloading of code As such, there is an implicit assumption that the service that holds a reference to the Jini lookup service lives inside a full Java virtual machine (JVM) that is at least capable of running the full RMI system This assumption is most evident if we consider the possibility of alternate implementations of the Jini lookup service, which might support remote interfaces beyond that specified by the Jini lookup service itself (currently the interface netjinicorelookupServiceRegistrar) Such an implementation would have a different RMI proxy than the current implementation, which would be downloaded if the device had a full JVM and RMI runtime Devices without a full JVM and RMI runtime would need a different way of dealing with such implementations of the service In addition to the need to download the stub code for the Jini lookup service, registering with the service requires the creation of an object of type netjinicorelookupServiceItem, which is itself made up of a set of objects in the Java programming language Maintenance of these entries in the Jini lookup service can require the creation of other objects in the Java programming language of the type netjinicoreentryEntry All of these objects are most easily constructed by using a running JVM Finally, registrations with the Jini lookup service are leased, with the lease that is returned requiring renewal for the service to continue to be shown in the lookup service The specification of the lookup service does not include a specification of the lease object that is returned by a registration All that is specified is an interface written in the Java programming language that must be supported by the (local) object that is returned as the lease Thus the design of the Jini lookup service requires that the code that implements the class that in turn implements the netjinicoreleaseLease interface be downloaded into the service that registers so that the lease can be renewed
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O'Reilly Network Safari Bookshelf Jini Specifications, The, Second Edition
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Section: DA Jini Device Architecture Specification
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NOW we will look at three different approaches for implementing a a Jini technology enabled service in hardware Each of the approaches will look the same to a client of the service Each approach takes a different route to interacting with the Jini lookup service and in providing an interface written in the Java programming language to clients of that service In each case, a different trade off was made between the complexity of the device, the flexibility of the device, and the directness of the communication between the client wanting to use the service and the device that implements the service All but the first of the examples make use of interposition, that is, the ability of a service to add a proxy between itself and the client of the service The service can use this proxy as an agent to the Jini technology infrastructure, off loading from the service some of the work needed to join the federation of Jini technology enabled services and/or devices The examples given in this chapter are not the only options available to the service designer who wishes to produce a service that includes a hardware component Rather, the examples are meant to show some samples of the range of implementation possibilities that are open to such designers In effect, this document is meant to show that, within the overall Jini architecture, there is no single Jini device architecture Instead, the device space is freed up, allowing different services to have hardware implementations with different price, performance, functionality, and flexibility design points DA21 Devices with Resident Java Virtual Machines An obvious design for a device that can become part of a federation of Jini technology enabled services and/or devices is one that includes the computing power, memory, and nonvolatile store necessary to have a full JVM and those parts of the Java application environment necessary to support the Jini technology infrastructure (in particular, those parts needed for code loading, RMI, and any required security) This would make the device into a specialized computing entity, with part of the device dedicated to the parts of the Java platform required by the Jini architecture On this approach, the hardware implementation is abstracted behind a device local software abstraction, which in turn is abstracted behind the proxy code used by the client to contact the service This sort of architecture is shown in Figure DA21
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