Test Runners in Java

Paint Data Matrix in Java Test Runners
Test Runners
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Java applications.
The way JUnit re ects on a class to nd tests and then runs those tests is controlled by a test runner The runner used for a class can be con gured with the @RunWith
Bar Code Drawer In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Download at WoweBookCom
Recognizing Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
3
Draw Data Matrix 2d Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in .NET framework applications.
An Introduction to the Tools
DataMatrix Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
annotation2 JUnit provides a small library of test runners For example, the Parameterized test runner lets you write data-driven tests in which the same test methods are run for many different data values returned from a static method As we ll see below, the jMock library uses a custom test runner to automatically verify mock objects at the end of the test, before the test xture is torn down
ECC200 Creation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Hamcrest Matchers and assertThat()
ECC200 Creation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Hamcrest is a framework for writing declarative match criteria While not a testing framework itself, Hamcrest is used by several testing frameworks, including JUnit, jMock, and WindowLicker, which we use in the example in Part III A Hamcrest matcher reports whether a given object matches some criteria, can describe its criteria, and can describe why an object does not meet its criteria For example, this code creates matchers for strings that contain a given substring and uses them to make some assertions:
Generate EAN13 In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Java applications.
String s = "yes we have no bananas today"; Matcher<String> containsBananas = new StringContains("bananas"); Matcher<String> containsMangoes = new StringContains("mangoes"); assertTrue(containsBananasmatches(s)); assertFalse(containsMangoesmatches(s));
Bar Code Generation In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Matchers are not usually instantiated directly Instead, Hamcrest provides static factory methods for all of its matchers to make the code that creates matchers more readable For example:
Print Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
assertTrue(containsString("bananas")matches(s)); assertFalse(containsString("mangoes")matches(s));
Creating Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
In practice, however, we use matchers in combination with JUnit s
Making Code 39 Full ASCII In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create Code39 image in Java applications.
assertThat(), which uses matcher s self-describing features to make clear exactly
Generating Leitcode In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create Leitcode image in Java applications.
what went wrong when an assertion fails3 We can rewrite the assertions as:
Painting Code 128 Code Set C In VB.NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
assertThat(s, containsString("bananas")); assertThat(s, not(containsString("mangoes"));
GS1 128 Maker In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in .NET applications.
The second assertion demonstrates one of Hamcrest s most useful features: de ning new criteria by combining existing matchers The not() method is a factory function that creates a matcher that reverses the sense of any matcher passed to it Matchers are designed so that when they re combined, both the code and the failure messages are self-explanatory For example, if we change the second assertion to fail:
Paint Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET applications.
2 By the time of publication, JUnit will also have a Rule annotation for elds to support objects that can intercept the lifecycle of a test run 3 The assertThat() method was introduced in JUnit 45
Making GS1 128 In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create GTIN - 128 image in ASP.NET applications.
Download at WoweBookCom
Bar Code Generator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET applications.
jMock2: Mock Objects
Creating Bar Code In C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
assertThat(s, not(containsString("bananas"));
Code39 Printer In C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in .NET applications.
the failure report is:
javalangAssertionError: Expected: not a string containing "bananas" got: "Yes, we have no bananas"
Instead of writing code to explicitly check a condition and to generate an informative error message, we can pass a matcher expression to assertThat() and let it do the work Hamcrest is also user-extensible If we need to check a speci c condition, we can write a new matcher by implementing the Matcher interface and an appropriately-named factory method, and the result will combine seamlessly with the existing matcher expressions We describe how to write custom Hamcrest matchers in Appendix B
jMock2: Mock Objects
jMock2 plugs into JUnit (and other test frameworks) providing support for the mock objects testing style introduced in 2 jMock creates mock objects dynamically, so you don t have to write your own implementations of the types you want to mock It also provides a high-level API for specifying how the object under test should invoke the mock objects it interacts with, and how the mock objects will behave in response
Understanding jMock
jMock is designed to make the expectation descriptions as clear as possible We used some unusual Java coding practices to do so, which can appear surprising at rst jMock s design was motivated by the ideas presented in this book, backed by many years of experience in real projects If the examples don t make sense to you, there s more description in Appendix A and at wwwjmockorg We (of course) believe that it s worth suspending your judgment until you ve had a chance to work through some of the examples
The core concepts of the jMock API are the mockery, mock objects, and expectations A mockery represents the context of the object under test, its neighboring objects; mock objects stand in for the real neighbors of the object under test while the test runs; and expectations describe how the object under test should invoke its neighbors during the test An example will show how these t together This test asserts that an AuctionMessageTranslator will parse a given message text to generate an auctionClosed() event For now, just concentrate on the structure; the test will turn up again in context in 12