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It seems the number of disgruntled IDS owners exceeds the number of satisfied customers Why are IDS deployments prone to failure The answer lies in the comparison among "must-have" products of the 1990s The must-have security product of the mid-1990s was the firewall A properly configured firewall implements access control (ie, the limitation of access to systems and services based on a security policy) Once deployed, a firewall provides a minimal level of protection If told to block traffic from the Internet to port 111 TCP, no one need ever check that it is doing its job (The only exception involves unauthorized parties changing the firewall's access control rules) This is a technical manager's dream: buy the box, turn the right knobs, and push it out the door It does its job with a minimum amount of attention After the firewall, security managers learned of IDSs In the late 1990s the IDS became the must-have product Commercial vendors like Internet Security Systems, the Wheel Group (acquired by Cisco in February 1998), and Axent (acquired by Symantec in July 2000) were selling IDS software by fall 1997 Articles like those in a September 1997 issue of InternetWeek praised IDSs as a "layer of defense that goes beyond the firewall" Even the Gartner Group, now critical of intrusion detection products, was swept up in the excitement In that InternetWeek article, the following opinion appeared:
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In the past, intrusion detection was a very labor-intensive, manual task, said Jude O'Reilley, a research analyst at Gartner Group's network division, in Stamford, Conn "However, there's been a leap in sophistication over the past 18 months," and a wider range of automated tools is hitting the market, he said Technical managers treated IDS deployments as firewall deployments: buy, configure, push out the door This model does not work for IDSs A firewall performs prevention, and an IDS performs detection A firewall will prevent some attacks without any outside supervision An IDS will detect some attacks, but a human must interpret, escalate, and respond to its warnings If you deploy an IDS but never review its logs, the system serves no purpose Successful IDS deployments require sound products, trained people, and clear processes for handling incidents It is possible to configure most IDSs as access control devices Features for implementing "shunning" or "TCP resets" turn the IDS from a passive observer into an active network participant I am personally against this idea except where human intervention is involved Short-term incident containment may merit activating an IDS's access control features, but the IDS should be returned to its network audit role as soon as the defined access control device (eg, a filtering router or firewall) is configured to limit or deny intruder activity
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This book is about network security monitoring I use the term network to emphasize the book's focus on traffic and incidents that occur over wires, radio waves, and other media This book does not address intruders who steal data by copying it onto a USB memory stick or burning it to a CD-ROM Although the focus for much of the book is on outsiders gaining unauthorized access, it pertains equally well to insiders who transfer information to remote locations In fact, once an outsider has local access to an organization, he or she looks very much like an insider
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Remember that "local access" does not necessarily equate to "sitting at a keyboard" Local access usually means having interactive shell access on a target or the ability to have the victim execute commands of the intruder's choosing
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Should this book (and NSM) pay more attention to insiders One of the urban myths of the computer security field holds that 80% of all attacks originate from the inside This "statistic" is quoted by anyone trying to sell a product that focuses on detecting attacks by insiders An analysis of the most respected source of computer security statistics, the Computer Crime and Security Survey conducted annually by the Computer Security Institute (CSI) and the FBI, sheds some light on the source and interpretation of this figure
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You can find the CSI/FBI studies in pdf format via Google searches The newest edition can be downloaded from http://wwwgoscicom
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The 2001 CSI/FBI study quoted a commentary by Dr Eugene Schultz that first appeared in the Information Security Bulletin Dr Schultz was asked: I keep hearing statistics that say that 80 percent of all attacks are from the inside But then I read about all these Web defacements and distributed denial of service attacks, and it all doesn't add up Do most attacks really originate from the inside Dr Schultz responded: There is currently considerable confusion concerning where most attacks originate Unfortunately, a lot of this confusion comes from the fact that some people keep quoting a 17-year-old FBI statistic that indicated that 80 percent of all attacks originated from the [inside] Should [we] ignore the insider threat in favor of the outsider threat On the contrary The insider threat remains the greatest single source of risk to organizations Insider attacks generally have far greater negative impact to business interests and operations Many externally initiated attacks can best be described as ankle-biter attacks launched by script kiddies But what I am also saying is that it is important to avoid underestimating the external threat It is not only growing disproportionately, but is being fueled increasingly by organized crime and motives related to espionage I urge all security professionals to conduct a first-hand inspection of their organization's firewall logs before making a claim that most attacks come from the inside Perhaps most successful attacks may come from the inside (especially if an organization's firewalls are well configured and maintained), true, but that is different from saying that most attacks originate from the inside
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Read Dr Schultz's commentary in full at http://wwwchi-publishingcom Look for the editorial in Information Security Bulletin , volume 6, issue 2 (2001) Adding to the confusion, Dr Shultz's original text used "outside" instead of "inside," as printed in this book The wording of the question and the thesis of Dr Shultz's response clearly show he meant to say "inside" in this crucial sentence
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Dr Dorothy Denning, some of whose papers are discussed in Appendix B, confirmed Dr Shultz's conclusions Looking at the threat, noted by the 2001 CSI/FBI study as "likely sources of attack," Dr Denning wrote in 2001: For the first time, more respondents said that independent hackers were more likely to be the source of an attack than disgruntled or dishonest insiders (81% vs 76%) Perhaps the notion that insiders account for 80% of incidents no longer bears any truth whatsoever
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