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The SHELLCODE x86 NOOP alert is triggered by the following Snort rule
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This chapter formally introduced the NSM tool Sguil and applied its capabilities to live intrusive traffic and to a case study using the reference intrusion model Sguil allows rapid, integrated access to alerts, full content data, and session data At the time of this writing, Sguil is still in the version 04x stage of development, but the interface as shown here should remain consistent Future development aims to reduce the burden of installation and allow for additional data sources to be accessed from within the interface If you would like to contribute to Sguil development in any manner, be sure to visit http://sguilsourceforgenet
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Part III: Network Security Monitoring Processes
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11 Best Practices 12 Case Studies for Managers
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In Parts I and II we explored NSM theory and some tools for conducting NSM Part III is intended for people who manage NSM operations It presents best practices for assessment, protection, detection, and response, as far as NSM is concerned While elements of NSM best practices appear throughout the book, this chapter focuses exclusively on the mind-set needed to conduct NSM operations 12 brings these principles to life in several case studies 1 introduced the security process in general In this chapter, I explain the NSM-specific aspects of each security process step (see Figure 111) First, I describe the benefits of developing a well-defined security policy during assessment Then I explain protection with respect to access control, traffic scrubbing, and proxies Next, detection is expanded to include collection, identification, validation, and escalation of suspicious events I elaborate on response within the context of short-term incident containment and emergency NSM Finally, I conclude by returning to the assessment phase by highlighting analyst feedback as a component of planning for the next cycle
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Figure 111 The security process, expanded for NSM
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Assessment
Assessment involves taking steps to ensure the probability of successfully defending an enterprise Within the NSM model, assessment means implementing products, people, and processes most conducive to accurately identifying and mitigating intrusions Part II illustrated NSM tools, and Part IV will offer suggestions for training people This entire chapter describes the processes that managers should plan to implement Supervisors should remember that it is not possible or preferable to plan the means by which analysts do their work Rather, managers should ensure that analysts are given the tools and training they need to identify and mitigate intrusions
Defined Security Policy
One of the best presents a manager could give an analyst, besides a workstation with dual 21-inch LCD monitors, is a well-defined security policy for the sites being monitored "Well-defined" means the policy describes the sorts of traffic allowed and/or disallowed across the organizational boundary For example, a fairly draconian security policy may authorize these outbound protocols and destinations:
Deploying dual monitors is less of a joke than it sounds It's an incredibly helpful strategy to manage information Analysts should always keep a primary monitoring console (Sguil, for example) in one workspace They can open a Web browser in the second workspace to conduct research on events
Web surfing using HTTP and HTTPS to arbitrary Web servers File transfer using FTP to arbitrary FTP servers Name resolution using DNS to the site's DNS servers Mail transfer using SMTP and POP3 to the site's mail servers VPN traffic (perhaps using IPSec or SSL) to the site's VPN concentrators
To meet the organization's business goals, the security policy would allow these inbound protocols to these destinations: Web surfing using HTTP and HTTPS to the site's Web servers Name resolution to the site's DNS servers Mail transfer using SMTP to the site's mail servers
Notice that for each item, both the protocol and the system(s) authorized to use that protocol are specified These communications should be handled in a stateful manner, meaning the response to an inbound VPN connection is allowed In the context of this security policy, anything other than the specified protocols is immediately suspect In fact, if the policy has been rigorously enforced, the appearance of any other protocol constitutes an incident In 1, I quoted Kevin Mandia and Chris Prosise to define an incident as any "unlawful, unauthorized, or unacceptable action that involves a computer system or a computer network" At the very least, the appearance of a peer-to-peer protocol like Gnutella would be an "unauthorized" event
Kevin Mandia and Chris Prosise, Incident Response and Computer Forensics , 2nd ed (New York: McGraw-Hill/Osborne, 2003, p 12)
Without a defined security policy, analysts must constantly wonder whether observed protocols are authorized Analysts have to resolve questions by contacting site administrators Once a responsible party validates the use of the protocol, analysts can move on to the next event Analysts working without well-defined security policies often define their own "site profiles" by listing the protocols noted as being acceptable in the past Creating and maintaining these lists wastes time better spent detecting intrusions