Great! How Do I Get Started in Java

Print Code 39 Extended in Java Great! How Do I Get Started
Great! How Do I Get Started
Generating Code-39 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Java applications.
The four essential steps to building an XML-based system or application are the following: 1 Requirements gathering (described in 3) 2 Abstract data modeling ( 4)
Barcode Maker In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
3 Application design, including DTD (document type definition) and schema design (s 5 and 6) 4 Implementation (s 8 and 9) If you follow this plan, you won't write one line of application code until step 4 Building an XMLbased application is writing software and requires the same rigorous approach The four steps don't mention platform at all Are we implementing on UNIX or Windows NT Oracle or MySql Java or Perl XML and database design free you from platform-dependent approaches to data storage and manipulation, so take advantage of that freedom, and don't even choose a platform until at least midway through step 2 Base that platform decision on what features it includes to get you closer to your goal built-in features that fit into your business requirements how easy the platform is to support ongoing operations (operational considerations) You can incorporate the same methodology when integrating XML into an existing RDBMS-based application Throughout the following chapters, we'll examine how to build an XML-based application You'll learn how to collect your requirements, build an abstract data model around these requirements, and then build an XML DTD and a relational schema around this data model We'll get into implementation only in the abstract, describing how your system must interact with the DTD and schema
Recognizing Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Summary
Create Code-39 In C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 image in .NET applications.
If I've done my job, you're excited about the raw potential of XML now You've seen how it can work to turn dumb documents into smart documents documents with oomph You should understand where some of my passion for these systems comes from I've seen them work and work well In the next chapter, we'll step back into the history of both XML and the relational database to provide a bit more context before moving forward with application design and development
Code-39 Creator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in ASP.NET applications.
2 Introducing XML and SQL: A History Lesson of Sorts
Print Code 3/9 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in .NET framework applications.
In which the compelling stories of the birth of our two heroes are revealed Before we delve into application design with XML and SQL, let's step back for a second to consider the historical context of these technologies No technology is developed in a vacuum, and understanding their historical contexts can provide valuable insight into current and future architectural decisions that you have to make If you're a judge who's trying to interpret some point of constitutional law, you need to understand the Founding Fathers' intentions If you're writing literary criticism, you need to understand the author's time and circumstances to understand his or her work better Likewise, to solve specific problems of their times, people build technology standards It pays to understand the context before you start fooling around with these technologies
Code39 Generation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in .NET framework applications.
Extensible Markup Language (XML)
Barcode Creation In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create bar code image in Java applications.
From reading the last chapter, you already know that XML is the best thing since sliced bread, but to set the scene more accurately, let's go back to the origins of XML and find out what it's really all about The design goals for XML (lifted from the text of the XML specification current at this writing XML 10 Second Edition[1]are as follows:
Printing EAN / UCC - 13 In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create GTIN - 128 image in Java applications.
XML 10 Second Edition is available at http://wwww3org/TR/2000/REC-xml-
European Article Number 13 Generation In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Java applications.
1 XML shall be straightforwardly usable over the Internet 2 XML shall support a wide variety of applications 3 XML shall be compatible with SGML 4 It shall be easy to write programs that process XML documents 5 The number of optional features in XML is to be kept to the absolute minimum, ideally zero 6 XML documents should be human legible and reasonably clear 7 The XML design should be prepared quickly 8 The design of XML shall be formal and concise 9 XML documents shall be easy to create 10 Terseness in XML markup is of minimal importance
Printing Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
The XML specification was written by the the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the body that develops and recommends Web specifications and standards Tim Berners-Lee founded the W3C in 1994 because he thought there might be something to the little information retrieval system he built while working as a research physicist at Switzerland's CERN laboratory The W3C's membership has since climbed to over 500 member organizations In 1994 the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) was in its infancy, having been built hastily on top of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) SGML, in turn, had become an international standard in 1986 when it was made so by the International Standards Organization (ISO) Actually it was based on the Generalized Markup Language (GML), developed in 1969 at IBM In 1996, the members of the W3C undertook what would become their most influential project: the creation of a new language for the Web, called eXtensible Markup Language (or XML for short) XML was related to SGML, but instead of defining a specific tag set as HTML does, XML enables the designer of a system to create tag sets to support specific domains of knowledge aca-demic disciplines such as physics, mathematics, and chemistry, and business domains such as finance, commerce, and journalism XML is a subset of SGML Like SGML, it is a set of rules for building markup languages Each of XML's rules is also a rule of SGML XML and languages like it use tags to indicate structure within a piece of text Here's a simple bit of XML-compliant HTML as an example:
Create Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Leitcode Drawer In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create Leitcode image in Java applications.
GS1 - 13 Generator In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in .NET framework applications.
Read Barcode In .NET
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Draw UPC Code In .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in VS .NET applications.