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Move Embellishment to Decorator
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Code provides an embellishment to a class's core responsibility
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Move the embellishment code to a Decorator
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Motivation
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When new features in a system are needed, it's common to add new code to old classes Such new code often embellishes the core
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responsibility or primary behavior of an existing class The trouble with some of these embellishments is that they complicate their host classes with new fields, new methods, and new logic, all of which exists for special-case behavior that needs to be executed only some of the time The Decorator pattern [DP] offers a good remedy: place each embellishment in its own class and let that class wrap the type of object it needs to embellish so that clients may wrap the embellishment around objects at runtime, when special-case behavior is needed The JUnit testing framework [Beck and Gamma] provides a good example JUnit makes it easy to write and run tests Each test is an object of type TestCase, and there's an easy way to tell the framework to run all of your TestCase objects But if you want to run one test multiple times, there's no embellishment within TestCase to do so For that extended behavior, you must decorate aTestCase object with a RepeatedTest Decorator, as the client code does in the following diagram
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Decorator is not a pattern you'd refactor to if you wanted to move an embellishment out of a class with dozens of public methods Why Because a Decorator must be what Design Patterns [DP] calls a "transparent enclosure": it must implementall of the public methods of the classes it decorates (and that would require a lot of useless code for a class with dozens of public methods) Transparent enclosures wrap objects in a way that is transparent to the objects being wrapped (ie, a decoratee doesn't know it has been decorated) Since a Decorator and its decoratee share the same interface, Decorators are transparent to client code that uses them Such transparency works well for client code, unless that code is deliberately checking the identity of an object In that case, the Decorator can prevent the client code from identifying a particular object instance because the Decorator and the object it decorates are instances of different classes For example, the following Java code if (node instanceof StringNode)
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would not evaluate to true if node were an instance of a StringNode that had been decorated with a concrete Decorator That shouldn't stop you from using this pattern, for it is often possible to rewrite client code to not rely on an object's type Another consideration for using this pattern involves multiple Decorators If you've written two or more concrete Decorators for an object, clients can decorate instances of the object with more than one Decorator In that case, the ordering of the Decorators may cause
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unwanted behavior For example, a Decorator that encrypts data can interfere with a Decorator that filters out certain words if the encryption happens prior to the filtering In the ideal case, it is best to have Decorators be so independent of each other that they can be arranged in any combination In practice, that sometimes isn't possible; then you can consider encapsulating the Decorators and giving clients access to safe combinations of them via specific Creation Methods (see Encapsulate Classes with Factory, 80) Refactoring embellishments out of a class can produce a design that is simple to those who are comfortable with object composition To those who aren't, code that used to be in one class is now spread out across many classes Such a separation may make code harder to understand since because it no longer resides in one place In addition, having code reside in different objects can make it harder to debug because debugging sessions must go through one or more Decorators before getting to a decorated object In short, if a team isn't comfortable with using object composition to "decorate" objects, the team may not be ready for this pattern Sometimes an embellishment provides protection logic for an object In that case, the embellishment can be moved to a Protection Proxy [DP] (see the example fromEncapsulating Inner Classes, 86) Structurally, a Protection Proxy is the same as a Decorator The difference is in intent A Protection Proxy protects an object, while a Decorator adds behavior to an object I like the Decorator pattern because it helps produce elegant solutions Yet my colleagues and I don't find ourselves refactoring to it very often We're more likely to refactor towards it and only refactor all the way to it once in a while As usual, no matter how much you like a pattern, use it only when you really need it
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