Starting with the Domain Layer in Java

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The start of the process is deciding which domain logic approach to go with The three main contenders are Transaction Script (110), Table Module (125), and Domain Model (116)
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As I indicated in 2 (page 25), the strongest force that drives you through this trio is the complexity of the domain logic, something currently impossible to quantify, or even qualify, with any degree of precision But other factors also play in the decision, in particular, the difficulty of the connection with a database
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The simplest of the three patterns is Transaction Script (110) It fits with the procedural model that most people are still comfortable with It nicely encapsulates the logic of each system transaction in a
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comprehensible script And it's easy to build on top of a relational database Its great failing is that it doesn't deal well with complex business logic, being particularly susceptible to duplicate code If you have a simple catalog application with little more than a shopping cart running off a basic pricing structure, then Transaction Script (110) will fill the bill perfectly However, as your logic gets more complicated your difficulties multiply exponentially
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At the other end of the scale is the Domain Model (116) Hard-core object bigots like myself will have an application no other way After all, if an application is simple enough to write with Transaction Scripts (110), why should our immense intellects bother with such an unworthy problem Also my experiences lead me to have no doubt that with really complex domain logic nothing can handle this hell better than a rich Domain Model (116) Once you get used to working with a Domain Model (116) even simple problems can be tackled with ease
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Yet the Domain Model (116) has its faults High on the list is the difficulty of learning how to use a domain model Object bigots often look down their noses at people who just don't get objects, but the consequence is that a Domain Model (116) requires skill if it's to be done well done poorly it's a disaster The second big difficulty of a Domain Model (116) is its connection to a relational database Of course, a real object zealot finesses this problem with the subtle flick of an object database But for many, mostly nontechnical, reasons an object database isn't a possible choice for enterprise applications The result is the messy relational database connection Let's face it, object models and relational models don't fit well together The complexity of many of the O/R mapping patterns I describe is the result
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Table Module (125) represents an attractive middle ground between these poles It can handle domain logic better than Transaction Scripts (110) Also, while it can't touch a real Domain Model (116) on handling complex domain logic, it fits really well with a relational database and many other things too If you have an environment such as NET, where many tools orbit around the all-seeing Record Set (508), then Table Module (125) works nicely by playing to the strengths of the relational database and yet representing a reasonable factoring of the domain logic
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In this argument we see that the tools you have also affect your architecture Sometimes you're able to choose the tools based on the architecture, and in theory that's the way you should go In practice, however, you often have to match your architecture to your tools Of the three patterns Table Module (125) is the one whose star rises the most when you have tools that match it It's a particularly strong choice for NET environments, since so much of the platform is geared around Record Set (508)
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If you read the discussion of domain logic in 2, much of this will seem familiar Yet I think it's worth repeating here because I really do think this is the central decision From here we go downward to the database layer, but now the decisions are shaped by the context of your domain layer choice
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