The Mobile Profile in Java

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The Mobile Profile
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The first and, at the present, only available standard profiles on the market is the Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP) This section covers some of the basics on MIDP, but for more detailed information, go to http://javasuncom/products/midp/ The MIDP is designed to run on top of the CLDC Devices that support the MIDP should have the following minimum set of characteristics:
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Display: Screen size of 96x54 Display depth of 1 bit Aspect ratio of pixels approximately 1:1
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Input: One-handed keypad, or two-handed keyboard, or touch screen
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Memory:
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128 kilobytes of non-volatile memory for the MIDP components 8 kilobytes of non-volatile memory for application-created persistence data 32 kilobytes of volatile memory for Java runtime (for example, heap memory)
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Networking: Two-way, wireless, possibly intermittent, with limited bandwith
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Most devices that implement the MIDP specification will be, at least initially, devices that exist on the market today, such as mobile phones and pagers
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MIDP in a Nutshell
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The MIDP has classes to handle the following:
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Application running User interface Persistent storage Networking Timers
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Earlier Profiles
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MIDP was first released in September 2000 Before that, two Asian mobile operators announced their own non-standard profiles:
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Kittyhawk Created by LG Telecom and Sun Microsystems This has been replaced by MIDP iAppli Created by NTT DoCoMo This is discussed fully in 22, "iAppli: Micro Java with a Twist"
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The next MIDP specification, which also runs on Palm OS devices, will be announced in April 2002, and is being produced by the Mobile Information Device Profile Expert Group (MIDPEG), whose members include America Online, Ericsson, Motorola, Nokia, Palm, Sun Microsystems and others
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Summary
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J2ME is a platform that is slowly being accepted and deployed by most hardware manufacturers In the near future, the majority of mobile phones, TV set-top boxes, pagers, and other micro devices will support J2ME Currently, CLDC is the only J2ME configuration available on the market, with two profiles laid on the top of it: MIDP and iAppli Because the latter profile is used only by NTT DoCoMo, MIDP is the gold standard for small devices The next chapter will show you how to begin developing a MIDP application
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9 Creating a MIDlet
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IN THIS CHAPTER
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Command-Line MIDlet Development Development Environments Lifecycle of a MIDlet Displaying Stuff Menus and Commands Creating Help and About Alert Screens Global Properties Summary
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If you have any experience creating Java applications or applets, then programming in J2ME won't seem like such a stretch The steps are basically the same: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Write your program and save it as a text file with the java extension Compile it Pre-verify it Package it Test it Debug it Release it!
The only thing that should set off your mental alarm is step number 3 pre-verification This might sound weird and complicated, but it's actually quite easy The purpose of pre-verification is to go through your bytecode and set hints up so that the actual verification of bytecode on the micro device will happen much more quickly, saving you valuable startup time
Command-Line MIDlet Development
You don't really need any fancy tools to create a MIDlet Simply install Java SDK 13 and the MIDlet libraries Get the Java SDK 13 from http://javasuncom/j2se/13/ Get the CLDC packages from http://wwwsuncom/software/communitysource/j2me/cldc/downloadhtml And grab the MIDP libraries from http://javasuncom/products/midp/ Install everything into the same directory To do so, create a directory similar to mkdir j2me You should then unzip the j2me_cldc-1_0-src-winsolzip file into the C:\j2me\ directory Then unzip midp-1_0a-speczip into the same directory You are now ready to write your MIDlet application A bit later in this chapter, we will discuss what all these methods mean and how it all works For now, just use a text editor to create the file Hellojava:
import javaxmicroeditionmidlet*; import javaxmicroeditionlcdui*; public class Hello extends MIDlet { private Display display; TextBox t = null;
public Hello() { display = DisplaygetDisplay(this); } public void startApp() { t = new TextBox("Hello ", "Howdy!", 256, 0); displaysetCurrent(t); } public void pauseApp() { } public void destroyApp(boolean unconditional) { } }
Make sure the Hellojava program is in the c:\j2me directory You can now compile the program the same way you would compile any other Java application Simply point to the appropriate MIDP and CLDC classes: