Output 52 in C#

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Output 52
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Inigo Montoya: Enough to survive on
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You can obtain the reference to a class from within instance members that belong to the class To indicate explicitly that the field or method accessed is an instance member of the containing class in C#, you use the keyword thisthis is simply an implicit field within every class definition that returns an instance of the object itself For example, consider the SetName() method shown in Listing 59
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Listing 59 Using this to Identify the Field's Owner Explicitly
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class Employee { public string FirstName; public string LastName; public string Salary; public string GetName() { return FirstName + " " + LastName; } public void SetName(string newFirstName, string newLastName) { thisFirstName = newFirstName; thisLastName = newLastName; } }
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This example uses the keyword this to indicate that the fields FirstName and LastName are instance members of the class
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The C# keyword this is identical to the Visual Basic keyword Me
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You also can use the keyword this to access a class's methods explicitly thisGetName() is allowed within the SetName() method, for example, allowing you to print out the newly assigned name (see Listing 510 and Output 53)
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Listing 510 Using this with a Method
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class Employee { // public string GetName() { return FirstName + " " + LastName; } public void SetName(string newFirstName, string newLastName) { thisFirstName = newFirstName; thisLastName = newLastName; ConsoleWriteLine("Name changed to '{0}'", thisGetName()); } } class Program { static void Main() { Employee employee = new Employee(); employeeSetName("Inigo", "Montoya"); // } // }
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Output 53
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Name changed to 'Inigo Montoya'
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In Listing 59 and Listing 510, the this keyword is optional, as demonstrated in the GetName() method where this is not used However, if local variables or parameters exist with the same name as the field, then leaving off this would result in accessing the local variable/parameter rather than the field, so this would be required
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In the SetName() method, you did not have to use the this keyword because FirstName is obviously different from newFirstName Consider, however, if instead of calling the parameter "newFirstName" you called it "FirstName" (using Pascal case), as shown in Listing 511
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Listing 511 Using this to Avoid Ambiguity
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class Employee { public string FirstName; public string LastName; public string Salary; public string GetName() { return FirstName + " " + LastName; } // Caution:Parameter names use Pascal case public void SetName(string FirstName, string LastName) { thisFirstName = FirstName; thisLastName = LastName; } }
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In this example, it is not possible to refer to the FirstName field without explicitly indicating that the Employee object owns the variable this acts just like the employee1 variable prefix used in the ProgramMain() method (see Listing 58); it identifies the reference as the one on which SetName() was called Listing 511 does not follow the C# naming convention in which parameters are declared like local variables, using camel case This can lead to subtle bugs because assigning FirstName (intending to refer to the field) to FirstName (the parameter) will still compile and even run To avoid this problem it is a good practice to have a different naming convention for parameters and local variables than the naming convention for fields I demonstrate one such convention later in this chapter
Sometimes it may be necessary to use this in order to pass a reference to the currently executing object Consider the Save() method in Listing 512
Listing 512 Passing this in a Method Call
class Employee { public string FirstName; public string LastName; public string Salary; public void Save() { DataStorageStore(this); } } class DataStorage { // Save an employee object to a file // named with the Employee name public static void Store(Employee employee) { // } }
The Save() method calls a method on the DataStorage class, called Store() The Store() method, however, needs to be passed the Employee object that needs to be persisted This is done using the keyword this, which passes the instance of the Employee object on which Save() was called