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CHAPTER 19
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Building a Product
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eclipserefreshLocal Refreshes the specified resources in the work-
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space For example:
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<eclipserefreshLocal resource="MyProject/MyFolder" depth="infinite"/>
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where resource is a resource path relative to the workspace and depth can be one of the following: zero, one, or infinite This is useful when an Ant build script has created, modified, or deleted a file or folder residing within the Eclipse workspace Eclipse will not reflect the change in the workspace until after this task executes
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javac Compiles Java source files into class files For example:
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<javac srcdir="${src}" destdir="${build}" classpath="xyzjar" debug="on"/>
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mkdir Creates a directory, and, when necessary, any of its nonexistent parent directories For example:
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property Sets a property or a collection of properties in the project
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(see Section 1914, Build properties, on page 699) For example:
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<property name="foodist" value="dist"/>
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<property file="fooproperties"/>
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zip Creates a ZIP file containing one or more files from a directory, or as specified by a <zipfileset> (a <zipfileset> is similar to a <fileset>; see preceding copy for more information about <fileset>) For example:
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<zip destfile="${dist}/manualzip" basedir="htdocs/manual"/>
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<zipfileset dir="htdocs/manual" prefix="docs/user-guide"/> </zip>
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191 A Brief Introduction to Ant
1914 Build properties
A property is a name/value pair, where the name is case-sensitive Properties can be used in the value of various task attributes by placing the property name between ${ and } in the attribute value
<property name="builddir" value="c:\build"/> <mkdir dir="${builddir}/temp"/>
In this build script, the builddir property is assigned the value c:\build in the first task, and then this property is resolved in the dir attribute of the second task so that the c:\build\temp directory is created An alternative form of the property task uses the location attribute:
<property name="builddir" location="dir/subdir"/>
When specified this way, the value is resolved relative to the ${basedir} before being associated with the builddir property For example, if the ${basedir} is c:\temp, then the statement above would have associated builddir with the value c:\temp\dir\subdir If the property task is modified slightly (notice the slash added before the dir/subdir):
<property name="builddir" location="/dir/subdir"/>
and ${basedir} is c:\temp, then the statement above would have associated builddir with the value c:\dir\subdir
Tip: Using the location attribute without a drive letter is more portable; if you specify a drive letter, then your build scripts will only run on a Windows platform
Unfortunately, a reference to an undefined property will not be reported during Ant execution, but silently ignored If a property has not been defined, then no string substitution is made For example, if you reference the foo property before it has been defined:
<echo message="the foo property is ${foo}"/>
then Ant will leave ${foo} unchanged and the message displayed will be:
the foo property is ${foo}
This makes it more difficult to spot problems, and you might end up with some unusual file or directory names, such as:
/temp/${plug-inid}_340/icons
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700 19141 Predefined properties
CHAPTER 19
Building a Product
Ant provides several predefined properties including all the Java system properties, such as ${osname}, as well as the built-in properties shown in Table 19 1
Table 19 1 Property Predefined Ant Properties Description The absolute path of the project s basedir as set with the basedir attribute of the <project> element The absolute path of the build file The version of Ant The name of the project that is currently executing as defined by the name attribute of the <project> element The JVM version Ant detected, such as 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , or 16
${basedir}
${antfile} ${antversion} ${antprojectname}
${antjavaversion}
Eclipse provides five additional predefined properties, as shown in Table 19 2
Table 19 2 Property Predefined Eclipse Ant Properties Description The location of the Eclipse installation directory The PDE build directory location (see Section 1924 on page 714) The PDE scripts directory location (see Section 1924 on page 714) (see Section 1924 on page 714)
${eclipsehome} ${eclipsepdebuildhome} ${eclipsepdebuildscripts}
${eclipsepdebuildtemplates} The PDE templates directory location ${eclipserunning} true if the Ant build has been launched from Eclipse, else undefined
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191 A Brief Introduction to Ant
19142 Property scoping
Properties are global within a build script from the moment they are declared If one task assigns a value to a property, another task within the same script can then use that property In the following script, the foo and bar properties are each declared in separate targets and referenced in others:
< xml version="10" encoding="UTF-8" > <project name="Test" default="test" basedir=""> <target name="init"> <property name="foo" value="xyz"/> <echo message="foo=${foo}"/> </target> <target name="sub1" depends="init"> <echo message="foo=${foo}"/> <property name="bar" value="abc"/> <echo message="bar=${bar}"/> </target> <target name="sub2" depends="init"> <echo message="foo=${foo}"/> <echo message="bar=${bar}"/> </target> <target name="test" depends="sub1,sub2"> <echo message="foo=${foo}"/> <echo message="bar=${bar}"/> </target> </project>
Looking at the output, you can see that the properties foo and bar can be referenced anytime after they are declared
Buildfile: scoping_test_1xml init: [echo] foo=xyz sub1: [echo] foo=xyz [echo] bar=abc sub2: [echo] foo=xyz [echo] bar=abc test: [echo] foo=xyz [echo] bar=abc BUILD SUCCESSFUL Total time: 234 milliseconds
Closer inspection of both the script and the output reveals something disturbing The bar property is declared in target sub1 and then referenced in target sub2 even though sub2 does not depend on sub1 This is important because Ant does not guarantee the order in which nondependent targets will be executed