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defined by the parameter-declaration-list, and replace D with D1 4 If D has the form D1 [constant-expression], then replace T with "array of T" that has the number of elements given by the constant-expression, and replace D with D1 5 Finally, if the declarator has the form & D1, then replace T with "reference to T" and D with D1 As an example, consider the declaration
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int *f();
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We start with T and D being int and *f(), so D has the form *D1, where D1 is f() You might think that D could have either of the forms D1() or *D1 However, if D had form D1(), then D1 would have to be *f, and D1 would also have to be a direct-declarator (because the grammar at the beginning of this section allows only a direct-declarator to precede ()) If we look at the definition of direct-declarator, however, we see that it cannot contain a * Therefore, D can only be *f(), which has the form *D1, where D is f() Now that we have determined that D1 is f(), we know that we must replace T with "pointer to T, " which is "pointer to int, " and replace D with f() We have not yet reduced D to a declarator-id, so we must repeat the process This time, D1 can only be f, so we replace T with "function returning T," which is "function returning pointer to int with no arguments," and we replace D with f At this point we have reduced D to a declarator-id, so we're done We have determined that the declaration
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int *f();
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declares f to have type "function with no arguments returning pointer to int " As another example, the declaration
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int* p, q;
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has two declarators, *p and q For each declarator, T is int For the first declarator, D is *p, so we transform T to "pointer to int," and D to p The declaration, therefore, gives p the type "pointer to int" We analyze the second declarator independently, with T again being int and D being q At this point it should be obvious that the declaration gives q the type int Finally, let's analyze the arcane example from 1012/173:
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double (*get_analysis_ptr())(const vector<Student_info>&);
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The analysis proceeds in the following five stages: 1 T: double D: (*get_analysis_ptr())(const vector<Student_info>&) 2 T: function returning double with const vector<Student_info>& argument D: (*get_analysis_ptr()) 3 T: function returning double (as before) D: *get_analysis_ptr() 4 T: pointer to function returning double D: get_analysis_ptr() 5 T: function returning pointer to function returning double D: get_analysis_ptr In other words, we learn that get_analysis_ptr is a function that returns a pointer to a function that returns a double result, and takes a const vector<Student_info>& as its argument We leave unwinding const vector<Student_info>& as an exercise Fortunately, few function declarations are this confusing; most of them look like
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declarator: declarator-id ( parameter-declaration-list )
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By far the most common difficult case is a function that returns a pointer to function
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Types pervade C++ programs Every object, expression, and function has a type, and the type of an entity determines its behavior With a single exception (the type of an object within an inheritance hierarchy that is accessed through a pointer or reference), the type of every entity is known at compile time In C++, types can be thought of as ways of structuring and accessing memory as well as ways of defining operations that can be performed on objects of the type That is, types specify both properties of data and operations on that data Although this book concentrates on using and building higher-level data structures, it is important to understand the primitive types used to build them These primitive types represent common abstractions that are close to the hardware, such as numbers (integral and floating point), characters (including wide characters for international character sets), truth values, and machine addresses (pointers, references, and arrays) Literals, also often called constants, represent integer, floating-point, Boolean, character, or string values This section reviews and expands on facilities related to the built-in types
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