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if (ch == 'U') { cp = new Core(is); } else {
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The read function starts by freeing the existing object (if any) to which the handle object was previously bound We do not need to check whether cp is 0 before calling delete, because the language guarantees that it is harmless to delete a pointer with value 0 Having freed the old value, we are ready to read the new one We start by reading and testing the first character on the line Based on that character, we create an object of the appropriate type, initializing that object by running the appropriate constructor that takes an istream These constructors call their own read functions to read values from the input stream into the newly created object After the object is constructed, we store the pointer to it in cp To finish up, we return the stream that we were given
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1342 Copying handle objects
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The copy constructor and assignment operator are necessary to manage the Core pointer The constructor allocates this pointer as a side effect of calling read When we copy a Student_info, we will want to allocate a new object and initialize it with the values from the object from which we are copying However, there is a snag: What kind of object are we copying There is no obvious way to know whether the Student_info object that we're copying points to a Core object or an object of a type derived from Core The way we solve this problem is to give Core and its derived classes a new virtual function That function creates a new object that holds copies of the values in the original:
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class Core { friend class Student_info; protected: virtual Core* clone() const { return new Core(*this); } // as before };
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The clone function does exactly what we described, in a surprisingly succinct fashion We allocate a new Core object and use Core's copy constructor to give that new object the appropriate values Remember that the Core class did not explicitly define a copy constructor Nonetheless, we know from 1135/201 that one exists: The compiler synthesized a default copy constructor, which copies each member from the existing Core object into the newly created one Because we created the clone function as an artifact of our implementation, we did not add it to the public interface of Core The fact that clone is protected means that we must nominate Student_info as a friend of Core, so that Student_info objects can access the clone function Class friendship is similar to the friend functions that we saw in 1232/216 There, we learned that friend functions have access to the private and protected members of the class Naming a class as a friend has the same effect as making all of the members of that class friends That is, by adding
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friend class Student_info;
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to the definition of Core, we are saying that all the member functions in Student_info may access all the private and protected members of class Core Having added the virtual function clone to the base class, we have to remember to redefine the function in the derived class, so that when we clone a derived object, we will allocate a new Grad object:
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class Grad { protected: Grad* clone() const { return new Grad(*this); }
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As with Core::clone, we allocate a new object as a copy of *this, but here we return a Grad* rather than a Core* Ordinarily, when a derived class redefines a function from the base class, it does so exactly: the parameter list and the return type are identical However, if the base-class function returns a pointer (or reference) to a base class, then the derived-class function can return a pointer (or reference) to a corresponding derived class We do not need to nominate Student_info as a friend of Grad, even though friendship is not inherited, because our Student_info class never refers to Grad::clone directly; it does so only through virtual calls to Core::clone, which it can access by virtue of its friendship with Core With these changes in place, we can now implement copying and assignment:
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Student_info::Student_info(const Student_info& s) : cp(0) { if (scp) cp = scp->clone(); } Student_info& Student_info::operator=(const Student_info& s) { if (&s != this) { delete cp; if (scp) cp = scp->clone(); else cp = 0; } return *this; }
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In the copy constructor, we initialize the pointer cp to 0, and conditionally call clone if there is something there to clone If not, cp will remain equal to 0, indicating that the handle is unbound Similarly, the assignment operator calls clone conditionally Of course, we have other work to do in the assignment operator before calling clone First we must guard against self-assignment, by testing whether the addresses of our two operands are the same If we are assigning different objects, then we must free the object to which cp currently points before making cp point to the newly created object Neither the copy constructor nor the assignment operator does anything special if cp is 0, because it is perfectly legitimate to copy or assign an unbound handle
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