Hello World the Starling Way in Java

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Hello World the Starling Way
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Hello World the Starling Way
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With our feet now firmly planted in the world of distributed queues and the basics of how Starling works, let s turn our attention to our familiar examples and see how Starling applies, if at all First up is the obligatory Hello World example:
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require 'rubygems' require 'starling' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') starlingset('hello', 'Hello, World!')
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This should seem quite familiar at this point We create a new instance of the Starling class and tell it on what host and port to find the server Then we call the set method, passing the hello as the name of the queue and our greeting, Hello, World! , as the message Our processing code would look something like this:
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require 'rubygems' require 'starling' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') puts starlingget('hello')
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When run it we see Hello, World! printed to the screen This is a pretty simple example In most of our other examples we ve had a nice HelloWorld class that we dealt with Let s see how that works out with Starling Let s start with the definition of our HelloWorld class:
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class HelloWorld def say_hi 'Hello, World!' end end
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7 Starling
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Now let s add a HelloWorld instance to our queue:
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require 'rubygems' require 'starling' require 'hello_world' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') starlingset('hello', HelloWorldnew)
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Seems pretty straightforward Now let s create our processing code:
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require 'rubygems' require 'starling' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') hello = starlingget('hello') puts hellosay_hi
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Again, this seems straightforward We call the get method on our instance of the Starling class and ask it for the next message in the hello queue We then get back our instance of the HelloWorld class and call the say_hi method on it However, when we run this code we get the following error:
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ArgumentError: undefined class/module HelloWorld
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This error is similar to one we saw when we first sent a proprietary object across the wire with DRb When we were dealing with DRb, we simply included the DRbUndumped module, and the problem went away However, it is not that simple with Starling The DRbUndumped trick worked so well with DRb because we were using DRb to transport objects, and it has special hooks to deal with this problem Starling, on the other hand, does not use DRb and does not give you a good way to handle this situation The problem, if you remember, arises because the Ruby VM that set the object into the queue has the class definition for the HelloWorld class, but the Ruby VM getting the object from the queue does not have the class definition So when the object is deserialized, there is no class definition to deserialize it into
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Building a Distributed Logger with Starling
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The only way to solve this problem is to require the class definition into all Ruby VMs that are expected to handle that class This would mean our processing class would now have to look like this:
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require 'rubygems' require 'starling' require 'hello_world' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') hello = starlingget('hello') puts hellosay_hi
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With the simple inclusion of require 'hello_world' we now have access to the HelloWorld class definition, and our code will now spit out the happy greeting Hello, World!
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Building a Distributed Logger with Starling
Moving on with our examples, let s look at Distributed Logger This example is actually simple with Starling, because the very act of logging is simply sending the logger a message to log Writing a message to our distributed logger is similar to our other examples:
require 'rubygems' require 'starling' starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') starlingset('d-logger', 'Hello, World!') starlingset('d-logger', 'Another Message')
On the logger side of things:
require 'rubygems' require 'starling' require 'logger'
starling = Starlingnew('127001:22122') logger = Loggernew(STDOUT) loop do message = starlingget('d-logger') loggerinfo(message) end
7 Starling
Here we are creating our Logger instance Then, in an infinite loop, we look for messages in our d-logger queue When we find a message, we log it Again, this sort of messaging is what Starling is designed for, and Starling excels at it If you want to get clever, you could create more queues, one of each of the different levels of logging available, and write your messages to those particular queues instead of having all messages logged to the info method I ll leave that up to you to play around with