Understanding Tuples and TupleSpaces in Java

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Understanding Tuples and TupleSpaces
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[:logging_service, :Logger, #<DRb::DRbObject:0x53714 @ref=206640, @uri="druby://192168112:55462">, "Primary Logger"]
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As you can see, we make three different requests for services, each with different Tuple templates Yet each time we get back a reference to the first Tuple entry we created When Rinda attempts to find a Tuple based on a Tuple template, it returns the first Tuple that matches the Tuple template passed into it This should demonstrate the importance not only of using a consistent Tuple template, but also of writing your Tuple to be as specific as possible
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Variation: Using Hashes for Tuples
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The standard way to create Tuples is to use the Array syntax we have been discussing, but it is also possible to use a Hash to represent the Tuple The rules for using the Hash syntax are pretty much the same as for the Array syntax If you provide a Tuple template with four keys, you must search using a Hash with the same four keys You still use nil as the wildcard for each of the keys in the Hash, as you would do with the Array syntax The only other restriction is that you have to use a String for the key and no other type of Object, including Symbols Let s see what our Hello World Tuple looks like using the Hash syntax:
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ring_serverwrite({'service_name' => :hello_world_service, 'service_class' => :HelloWorldServer, 'service_instance' => HelloWorldServernew, 'service_description' => 'I like to say hi!'}, Rinda::SimpleRenewernew )
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2 Rinda
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The reading of that Tuple would look something like this:
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ring_serverread({'service_name' => :hello_world_service, 'service_class' => nil, 'service_instance' => nil, 'service_description' => nil})
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After you have a Tuple, you can retrieve the instance by doing something like this:
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service['service_instance']
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In my opinion, that is a lot easier to read than this:
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service[2]
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During the writing of this book, I came to enjoy the Hash syntax more than the Array syntax I find that although it involves a bit more typing, it makes the code more readable The only real downside, I ve found, is that there is no standard naming convention for the keys to the Hash So if you decide to use the Hash syntax, you also have to publish an API for the keys that the Hash expects This is also somewhat true for the Array syntax You can publish a Tuple of any size and with the elements in whatever order you want them But as mentioned earlier, there does seem to be some consensus in the community about how an Array-based Tuple should be organized
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Taking a Tuple from a TupleSpace
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Now that you have a firm grasp on how to read and write from our TupleSpace, let s see what happens when we throw a bit of concurrency into the mix Let s look at a fairly contrived example Let s build a Counter Service We will build a Rinda
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Understanding Tuples and TupleSpaces
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service that simply hosts an Integer, which will start at 0 Our client is responsible for incrementing that number by 1 First, the server:
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require 'rinda/ring' DRbstart_service ring_server = Rinda::RingFingerprimary ring_serverwrite([:count_service, 0], Rinda::SimpleRenewernew) DRbthreadjoin
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Only two things are worth mentioning about our service First, I used a nonstandard Array syntax for the Tuple I only did that for the sake of brevity The other thing worth mentioning, and this really goes for this whole example, is that the best way to solve our problem would be to let the server update the Integer But that wouldn t be any fun Instead, we will let our client do that:
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require 'rinda/ring' DRbstart_service ring_server = Rinda::RingFingerprimary threads = [] 10times do |th| threads << Threadnew do 10times do |i| service = ring_serverread([:count_service, nil]) sleep(rand(5)) puts "#{th}: #{i} (#{serviceinspect})\n" updated_count = service[1] + 1 puts "#{th}: #{i} (#{updated_count})\n" ring_serverwrite([:count_service, updated_count]) end end end threadseach {|t| tjoin} service = ring_serverread([:count_service, nil]) puts serviceinspect