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#<DRb::DRbObject:0x822e4 @uri="druby://127001:61676", @ref=265410>
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On the server side, we see something similar to the following:
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"helloobject_id: 265410"
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As we can see, the object_id on the server printout matches the @ref instance variable on the DRbObject we received from the server This is the default because it is incredibly easy to make sense of how the reference ID is created and how it is mapped on the server side It is also pretty efficient to grab the object from the ObjectSpace using the object_id, so there is definitely a performance win to be had using this default ID converter
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DRb::TimerIdConv
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The default ID converter, DRb::DRbIdConv, has one downside If you re not careful, referenced objects on the server can become garbage-collected and are no longer available when the client tries to reference them Although the client has a pointer to the local DRb::DRbObject it got from the server, the server itself may no longer have a pointer to the object that is referenced from the client In that case it becomes eligible for garbage collection One solution to this problem is to use the DRb::TimerIdConv class The only difference between DRb::TimerIdConv and DRb::DRbIdConv is that DRb::TimerIdConv tells the server to keep its objects alive for a certain amount of time after they were last accessed The default length for this keepalive is 600 seconds, or 10 minutes Because of the nature of this ID converter, it s rather difficult to show a good working example of objects being garbage-collected by the server and the server losing the reference to them, and so on What we can look at is how to install a new ID converter for our HelloWorldServer:
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require 'drb' require 'drb/timeridconv' class HelloWorldServer def say_hello Hellonew end end class Hello include DRbUndumped
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def to_s "Hello, world!" end end
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1 Distributed Ruby (DRb)
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DRbinstall_id_conv(DRb::TimerIdConvnew(30)) DRbstart_service("druby://127001:61676", HelloWorldServernew) DRbthreadjoin
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Our updated server code has two important lines The first is where we require DRb::TimerIdConv with require 'drb/timeridconv' The second is the following line:
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DRbinstall_id_conv(DRb::TimerIdConvnew(30))
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With this line we tell DRb to use an instance of DRb::TimerIdConv that has a timeout of 30 seconds Because we used the install_id_conv method, we have told the Ruby VM that is running our server that any DRb services in that VM should use the DRb::TimerIdConv converter Later, when we talk about creating a custom ID converter, we ll learn how to assign a particular ID converter to a particular service, despite what is configured as the global converter for that VM At this point you might wonder why you shouldn t use the DRb::TimerIdConv class all the time If it helps protect you from garbage collection, isn t that something you want The answer is yes and no It s always a good idea to make sure your objects are there when you reference them However, think about what happens when you use this particular ID converter You tell the Ruby VM to not garbage-collect those objects for a minimum of N seconds after the last time that object was touched If you have a high-traffic service, you could quickly increase your memory usage while Ruby holds on to all these objects that you may or may not need to have hanging around A better approach to solve the garbage-collection problem lies in your architecture Don t take an object from the server and hold onto it in the client for any longer than you absolutely need to Retrieve the object from the server, use it, and then get rid of it If you want to make sure you have access to that same referenced object minutes, hours, or days later, you should consider writing your own custom ID converter that stores your objects in something other than the ObjectSpace
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