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DRb can be run on any operating system capable of running Ruby
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1 Distributed Ruby (DRb)
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Although DRb has its advantages, it also has disadvantages DRb can prove to be unreliable under heavy loads While it has reasonable speed, thanks to the underlying marshaling, socket, and thread classes, that speed can quickly degrade when placed under considerable load Finally, DRb can tightly couple applications, because you are not calling a defined API but rather methods on objects that may or may not change over time So although DRb might be the perfect solution for connecting a set of smaller applications, it might be unsuitable in large-scale, high-volume production environments With that said, it s important to discuss DRb, because it lays a nice foundation for distributed programming with Ruby, and it can definitely be useful in certain environments Here is what the documentation says when introducing DRb: dRuby is a distributed object system for Ruby It allows an object in one Ruby process to invoke methods on an object in another Ruby process on the same or a different machine This is Ruby s equivalent of Java s RMI package The DRb package is the basis for most of the distributed programming done in Ruby This chapter explores the DRb package You ll start by getting your feet wet, and by the end of the chapter you will be able to write robust, secure, and interactive applications using DRb
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To help you get a feel for any language, framework, or package, the obligatory Hello World example has held up well So why should our journey into distributed programming with Ruby be any different Let s start by taking a quick look at how things are done using another language s framework for distributed programming In the introduction to this book I spoke of my past experiences using Java s RMI package, so let s use that to help us compare and contrast a bit I promise you this will be a very brief look into the past It will help illustrate how writing distributed applications with Ruby is quite simple First, when using Java RMI, we have to create an interface for our server to later implement:
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package examplehello; import javarmiRemote; import javarmiRemoteException; public interface Hello extends Remote { String sayHello() throws RemoteException; }
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We re saying that our Hello interface will extend the javarmiRemote class We are also saying that any class that implements our Hello interface will need to provide a sayHello method that returns a String Now that we have our interface, we can write our Hello World server class:
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package examplehello; import import import import javarmiregistryRegistry; javarmiregistryLocateRegistry; javarmiRemoteException; javarmiserverUnicastRemoteObject;
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public class Server implements Hello { public Server() {} public String sayHello() { return "Hello, world!"; } public static void main(String args[]) { try { Server obj = new Server(); Hello stub = (Hello) UnicastRemoteObjectexportObject(obj, 0); // Bind the remote object's stub in the registry Registry registry = LocateRegistrygetRegistry(); registrybind("Hello", stub); Systemoutprintln("Server ready"); } catch (Exception e) {
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1 Distributed Ruby (DRb)
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Systemerrprintln("Server exception: " + etoString()); eprintStackTrace(); } } }
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In our Server class we are implementing our Hello interface We have a sayHello method that returns a new String, "Hello, world!" When we run this class, the main method is executed The main method creates a new instance of the Server class It then creates a remoteable stub of the Hello interface using the instantiated Server class The main method then finds a javarmiRegistry and binds the stub to the registry with the name Hello Before we look at the Ruby equivalent of our Server class, let s take a look at the Java client for our Hello World application:
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package examplehello; import javarmiregistryLocateRegistry; import javarmiregistryRegistry; public class Client { private Client() {} public static void main(String[] args) { try { Registry registry = LocateRegistrygetRegistry(); Hello stub = (Hello) registrylookup("Hello"); String response = stubsayHello(); Systemoutprintln("response: " + response); } catch (Exception e) { Systemerrprintln("Client exception: " + etoString()); eprintStackTrace(); } } }
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Our client is pretty straightforward When the class is executed, the main method is called The first thing the main method does is find the javarmiRegistry, the
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