Figure 8-2 Sequence diagram for the revised transfer funds use case in Java

Print QR Code 2d barcode in Java Figure 8-2 Sequence diagram for the revised transfer funds use case
Figure 8-2 Sequence diagram for the revised transfer funds use case
Encoding Denso QR Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in Java applications.
Sequence Diagrams
Making Bar Code In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Once gray-box details have been added to the textual use case description, more elaborate sequence diagrams can be created to reveal the internal work ings of the system Instead of showing the interaction between actors and a monolithic system, the system is split into analysis level objects The responsibilities of the system are divided among the analysis level objects to achieve a finer grained sequence diagram
Barcode Scanner In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
There are three kinds of analysis objects, and each plays a specific role in the refined model of the system
Denso QR Bar Code Creator In C#
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Boundary Objects
Create QR Code 2d Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in ASP.NET applications.
As the name suggests, boundary objects exist at the periphery of the system They are on the front line, interacting with the outside world
Print Quick Response Code In .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in VS .NET applications.
In the refined model, boundary objects represent all interactions between the system's inner workings and its surroundings These include interaction with a user via a graphical user interface, interactions with other actors (such as those representing other systems), communications with devices, and so on An example of a boundary object in the online banking example would be the user interface for the logon scenario
QR Code JIS X 0510 Generation In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in .NET framework applications.
One of the advantages of using boundary objects is that they serve to isolate and shield the rest of the s ystem from external concerns
Create Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
Boundary objects are identified via the <<boundary>> stereotype Alternately, a circle with a perpendicular T can be used as the icon representation of a boundary object Boundary objects are transitional in nature and usually, though not always, only last for the lifetime of a use case Generally speaking, each actor-use case interaction pair maps to a boundary object This is shown in Figure 8 - 3
Code 128 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Java applications.
Figure 8-3 Each use case-actor relationship is a potential boundary object
UPC-A Creation In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create UPCA image in Java applications.
Entity Objects
EAN 128 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Java applications.
Entity objects represent information of significance to the system They are usually persistent and exist for an extended duration Their primary purpose is to represent and manage information within the system
Data Matrix Drawer In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Java applications.
Key concepts within a system manifest themselves as entity objects in the model For example, in the online banking case study, information about the customer, the accounts, and so on would be suitable for modeling as entity objects
Making Postnet 3 Of 5 In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Delivery Point Barcode (DPBC) image in Java applications.
Entity objects are stereotyped as <<entity>> or shown as a circle with a tangential line at the bottom of the circle Entity objects usually span multiple use cases and might even exist beyond the existence of the system itself Information needs vary radically between systems, and so do the number of entity objects in a use case or a system
Code 3 Of 9 Printer In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in .NET applications.
Figure 8 - 4
ECC200 Recognizer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
for an example of a use case to entity mapping
Code 3/9 Scanner In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Figure 8-4 Entity objects and use cases
Bar Code Creator In VB.NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET framework applications.
Control Objects
Bar Code Scanner In VS .NET
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Control objects are used to model behavior within the system Control objects do not necessarily implement the behavior, but may instead work with other objects to achieve the behavior of the use case
Make Code128 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in ASP.NET applications.
The idea is to separate the behavior from the underlying information associated with the model, making it easier to deal independently with changes in either la ter on
Make Data Matrix ECC200 In C#
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in .NET framework applications.
Control objects are usually transient in nature and cease to exist once the use case has been completed They are identified via the <<control>> stereotype or as a circle with an arrow icon
An example of a control object within the system may be a n object that coordinates secure access to the online banking system There may be one or more control objects per use case The mapping is shown in Figure 8 - 5
Figure 8-5 Control object and use case
Figure 8- 6
shows a composite view of the Transfer funds use case and the analysis objects
identified for the use case thus far Note the iconic representation of the boundary, control, and entity objects
Figure 8-6 Transfer funds use case and associated analysis objects
An updated version of the sequence diagram for the Transfer funds use case, this time with the system decomposed into analysis objects, is shown in Figure 8 - 7
Figure 8-7 Refined sequence diagram for the transfer funds scenario
There are a few things to note in the refined sequence diagram shown in Figure 8 - 7 If you compare it to Figure 8 - 2 at the beginning of the chapter, the overall scope or detail of the sequence diagram has not changed Instead, diffe rent pieces of the system are now collectively responsible for the same set of responsibilities For instance, the interaction with the customer is the responsibility of the TransferPage[1] boundary object The boundary object in turn interacts with a controller that coordinates the activities within the use case Several entity objects are involved in fulfilling the use case It should be noted that a separate sequence diagram, perhaps involving interactions between a different set of objects, should be created for each significant complete path (flow of events) that can be taken through the use case These paths, or scenarios, might be generated as the actors deviate from the most expected behavior or if exceptional conditions occur within the system The collection of
these sequence diagrams can be part of the same use case realization They collectively show the possible internal interactions that can occur as the use case is performed