AVL Trees in Java

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The first balanced binary search tree was the AVL tree (named after its discoverers, Adelson-Velskii and Landis), which illustrates the ideas that are thematic for a wide class of balanced binary search trees It is a binary search tree that has an additional balance condition Any balance condition must be easy to maintain and ensures that the depth of the tree is O(1og N) The simplest idea is to require that the left and right subtrees have the same height Recursion dictates that this idea apply to all nodes in the tree because each node is itself a root of some subtree This balance condition ensures that the depth of the tree is logarithmic However, it is too restrictive because inserting new items while maintaining balance is too difficult Thus the definition of an AVL tree uses a notion of balance that is somewhat weaker but still strong enough to guarantee logarithmic depth
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The AVL tree was the first balanced binary search tree It has historical significance and also illustrates most of the ideas that are used in other schemes
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DEFINITION: An AVL tree is a binary search tree with the additional
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balance property that, for any node in the tree, the height of the left and right subtrees can differ by at most 1 As usual, the height of an empty subtree is -1
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Figure 1921 Two binary search trees: (a) an AVL tree; (b) not an AVL tree (unbalanced nodes are darkened)
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Figure 1922 Minimum tree of height H
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Every node in an AVL tree has subtrees whose heights differ by at most 1 An empty subtree has height -1
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The AVL tree has height at most roughly 44 percent greater than the minimum
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Figure 1921 shows two binary search trees The tree shown in Figure 1921(a) satisfies the AVL balance condition and is thus an AVL tree The tree shown in Figure 1921(b), which results from inserting 1, using the usual algorithm, is not an AVL tree because the darkened nodes have left subtrees whose heights are 2 larger than their right subtrees If 13 were inserted, using the usual binary search tree insertion algorithm, node 16 would also be in violation The reason is that the left subtree would have height 1, while the right subtree would have height -1 The AVL balance condition implies that the tree has only logarithmic depth To prove this assertion we need to show that a tree of height H must have at least CHnodes for some constant C > 1 In other words, the minimum number of nodes in a tree is exponential in its height Then the maximum depth of an N-item tree is given by Iog,N Theorem 193 shows that every AVL tree of height H has many nodes
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An AVL tree of height H has at least FH Fibonacci number (see Section 834)
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I nodes, where Fiis the ith
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Theorem 193
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Let SH be the size of the smallest AVL tree of height H Clearly, So = 1 and S , = 2 Figure 1922 shows that the smallest AVL tree of height H must have subtrees of height H - 1 and H - 2 The reason is that at least one subtree has height H - 1 and the balance condition implies that subtree heights can differ by at most 1 These subtrees must themselves have the fewest number of nodes for their heights, so SH = SH - + SH - + 1 The proof can be completed by using an induction argument
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Proof
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From Exercise 88, F, = $I,/&, where ( = ( 1 + & ) / 2 = 1618 ConI sequently, an AVL tree of height H has at least (roughly) @H+'/& nodes Hence its depth is at most logarithmic The height of an AVL tree satisfies
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so the worst-case height is at most roughly 44 percent more than the minimum possible for binary trees The depth of an average node in a randomly constructed AVL tree tends to be very close to log N The exact answer has not yet been established analytically We do not even known whether the form is log N + C or ( 1 + E) log N + C, for some E that would be approximately 001 Simulations have been unable to demonstrate convincingly that one form is more plausible than the other A consequence of these arguments is that all searching operations in an AVL tree have logarithmic worst-case bounds The difficulty is that operations that change the tree, such as insert and remove,are not quite as simple as before The reason is that an insertion (or deletion) can destroy the balance of several nodes in the tree, as shown in Figure 1921 The balance must then be restored before the operation can be considered complete The insertion algorithm is described here, and the deletion algorithm is left for Exercise 1911 A key observation is that after an insertion, only nodes that are on the path from the insertion point to the root might have their balances altered because only those nodes have their subtrees altered This result applies to almost all the balanced search tree algorithms As we follow the path up to the root and update the balancing information, we may find a node whose
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