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The order that the logical cursor moves is up to the implementer of the IEnumerator interface and doesn't have to be tied to the physical order of the items in the collection For example, if you were implementing an enumerator for a sortable collection, you would want to modify the order that the cursor moved through the collection based on the sort order However, if you plan to support sorting, you should look into implementing the IBindingList interface as well
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You access the items that are being iterated over through the Current property The Current property on the IEnumerator interface returns an Object reference that should point to the current item at the logical cursor's position in the collection The IEnumerator interface also includes a Reset method, which returns the cursor to its initial position, allowing you to iterate over the same collection again using the same enumerator The following code snippet shows a typical loop using the IEnumerable and IEnumerator interfaces to iterate over a collection List<int> myvals = new List<int>(); myvalsAdd(42); myvalsAdd(38); myvalsAdd(13); IEnumerable enumerable = myvals; IEnumerator enumerator = enumerableGetEnumerator(); while (enumeratorMoveNext()) { int val = (int)enumeratorCurrent; } enumeratorReset();
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The List<T> generic collection implements the IEnumerable interface (and its IEnumerable<T> generic counterpart), so the code obtains an IEnumerable interface reference to the collection through an implicit cast It then calls GetEnumerator on that interface reference, which returns an interface reference of type IEnumerator Once you have an enumerator, you set up awhile loop on its MoveNext method The first call to MoveNext positions the cursor on the first item and returns true if anything is in the collection and enters the loop block If the collection is empty, MoveNext returns false and never enters the loop Each time through the loop, the cursor's position is advanced when MoveNext is called until the last item is reached Then the next time thewhile statement call to MoveNext returns false and exits the loop Figure 71 depicts what is going on in this process
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Figure 71 Moving Through a Collection with IEnumerator
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Because the IEnumerable and IEnumerator interfaces are a fundamental pattern in NET, support for them is baked in at the language level Both C# and VBNET support a foreach construct that lets you conveniently iterate through a collection like this: List<int> myvals = new List<int>(); myvalsAdd(42); myvalsAdd(38);
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myvalsAdd(13); foreach (int val in myvals) { ConsoleWriteLine(valToString()); }
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Under the covers, the foreach operator uses the Current property and MoveNext method defined by the IEnumerator interface on the object returned from GetEnumerator to iterate through the collection, as described earlier The generated Intermediate Language (IL) code doesn't actually use the IEnumerator interface reference to access the current item; it just calls theCurrent property on the object itself As a result, if the type implementing the IEnumerator interface contains a Current property that returns a specific type instance (such as Int32 or Double), then the foreach loop can avoid boxing and unboxing those values as it iterates through the collection See the sidebar " The Problem with Type Unsafe Enumeration" for details on why foreach is implemented this way When implementing collections in NET 20 that will contain specific types, you should also implement the generic versions of these interfaces, IEnumerable<T> and IEnumerator<T> Generic interface types are used in NET 20 to provide type safety for the contained types and to avoid performance penalties that could result for collections that contained value types when using the IEnumerable and IEnumerator interfaces The untyped interfaces still have a place; they are used by the data-bound controls in NET because they don't want to make assumptions about the specific types contained in collections that you will use in data binding, which would limit the scenarios that data-bound controls could support The IEnumerator<T> interface doesn't include aReset method in order to simplify the implementation of enumerator objects For simple collections where you use an explicit index into an array of objects, resetting the enumerator is a simple matter But for more intricate scenarios, implementing a Reset method can get more complicated than it is worth If you need to iterate over a collection multiple times, you can simply obtain multiple enumerators by calling GetEnumerator more than onceIEnumerator<T> is also different from IEnumerator in that it derives from IDisposable because of this assumption that enumerators are designed to be used once and then disposed of If your enumerator maintains any internal state to manage the current context of the logical cursor, the Dispose method of the IDisposable interface is where you should clean them up You should also implement a finalizer to perform that same clean up if your collection's client fails to call Dispose
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