Exercise 4: The Transit Exercise in Visual Studio .NET

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Exercise 4: The Transit Exercise
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The coach boat is anchored and the sailors sail up to the middle of the line (the longer the line is, the harder the exercise). When, and only when, the boat is stationary, the sailors raise a hand and the coach can then inform them whether they are on/over or behind the line. Ideally, the exercise is repeated until the sailors are consistently on the line.
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Wind
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Boats drifting to leeward 5.3c Lining up in the group (drifting sideways).
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Top Tip: When sitting on the line you need to see along a straight edge. Looking down the bowsprit or down the tiller (when in the centre) can work very well. If the helm is on the line, often you are a half a boat length over.
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Starting at Port or Starboard End
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When you start at the pin end you need to be careful. If you start right by the buoy it is possible that you may not be able to get over the line at all with a bad start. The best way is often to come in from port on port and nd a gap, somewhere along the line.
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Port tack approach
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5.3d Port tack approach.
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It may be possible to be the closest boat to the pin, but often it will be safer to nd a natural gap along the line. Look how the line is building and time your approach accordingly. If you have to duck boats, being on port is an advantage as the other boats on starboard will be moving slightly, so you will pass more boats than you would if you had to sail under them on starboard. Starting at the starboard end may be quite dif cult. Often a large committee boat will have a large wind shadow, and if you are over you are likely to get your numbers taken. You will need to choose early how close to the end you wish to start. Often this is dictated by how soon you wish to tack after the start. (If you have to go right you may even consider
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risking a second row start if it guarantees you will be among the rst to tack!) See how quickly you drift sideways and line up so you will be where you wish to be at start time. Quality eets may line up quite early, and there is unlikely to be much room if the line is quite biased. Think: is it a day when a gap is likely to appear Top Tip: The more kicker you have on, the more the boat will want to go head to wind. The more kicker you let off, the more the boat will slip sideways. Try and nd a balance point, which is usually about halfway between kicker fully off and the kicker you will be using on the beat.
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Exercise 5: Protecting Your Space
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Keeping your gap to leeward is vital: you need the space to accelerate into. When everyone is looking for a space to start, you need to protect your gap (shutting the door). Keep the bow off the wind (below close hauled course); the boom is now out (the sails are apping) this closes the gap. If any sailors come in to leeward, they must give you room to keep clear. As you head up to avoid them
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Head up to create gap
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Sail flapping Bow down to protect gap Sail flapping 5.3e Protecting the gap.
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you will still have room (although the hole will now be smaller). To create space or to make it larger, work the boat up to above close hauled course (without sheeting in the sails). For the start, make any nal rig changes before you bear away. Use the jib to help you do this before the gun and go down to below close hauled course, allowing your sails to ll on a close reach. (As soon as the boat is up to speed you may return to a close hauled course.) If you do not have a jib, you will need to use the rudder to bear away. Pull the tiller towards you hard, gently push it away and then pull it hard towards you again. Ensure that the bow is bearing away and you are not making the boat go forward (as this would break rule 42). Top Tip: If you do lose your space, try and look for another one early if there is still time. Sometimes you will be forced to start in a dif cult place, but often there is a better alternative. Once you are completely stationary or head to wind, it is very hard to manoeuvre, so avoid this if possible. Whatever happens, as soon as the gun has gone, concentrate on getting your boat up to maximum speed. Now get your head out of the boat to consider your options (carry on or tack), as these early decisions will make a big impact on your race and remember, keep trying! Sailing is a dynamic sport and it is possible to recover from a poor start. It is often these races (not your best ones) which decide the outcome of a championship. You can discuss what went wrong (or right!) with the start after the race. Keeping good records is vital. You may even choose to use a regatta as a practice regatta , so as to test your starts often two OCSs in a regatta could be disastrous.
Advice from Paul Goodison:
Become comfortable with the conditions. I sail most of the beat before the start sequence to gain con dence in my boat speed and set-up. Devise a plan and strategy: which way do I want to go up the beat And where do I want to start Once the line is set, look for transits and decide how valuable they might be. Once the warning signal has sounded, it s time to double-check the transit and line bias. Get ready to synchronise the watch at the preparatory signal. Sail upwind again to double-check the set-up and the line bias. Leaving the sail controls set in the upwind settings but with the kicker eased, return behind the line. Leaving the kicker eased stops the boat from accelerating when hovering. At the 1 minute signal, check the timing again and get in position for the nal approach. This may need to be done earlier in larger eets when the line is heavily biased. Try to maintain sight of one end of the line at all times, so as to be able to gauge your position. You need to be aware of what is happening around, especially boats entering from astern that may steal the gap to leeward. With 25 seconds to go, start to create a gap to leeward. Any earlier than this and the gap will be open for others.