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Figure 5-3 A graphical authorization map for CoFINSmth.
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Sarbanes-Oxley and other external regulations requiring adequate controls render container-based security obsolete for auditable records as well as for data, personal medical information, and personally identifying information. Authorization must be designed and technically implemented in a way that can control access rights to a single field in a database or a single file in a data storage area. If your authorization and access controls cannot do that and at the same time provide an audit trail as to who may have made the last change in the field or file, they are hardly adequate in the current regulatory environment, let alone the rules that may be promulgated in the near term. Take stock of your current access control situation, particularly the quality of your authorization process and how well your existing access controls are capable of enforcing the rights granted. Very few existing implementations establish a distinct, tightly controlled relationship between individual end users and finite data elements. For example, it would not be appropriate for any supervisor in the company to see every employee s Social Security number in a human resources application. Privacy advocates would argue that even HR staff should not be able to see it once entered into the income tax reporting data field.
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Understanding Access Control
The output of the authorization process becomes the design input requirements for the access controls. Access controls enforce the requirements that flow from the authorizations by allowing the access rights granted by authorization or preventing access that is deliberately denied. In designing access controls, you will find some factors, normally out of your control, that either limit or facilitate your achieving the finite controls identified in the authorization process. Many of the software products and programs in use in your organization have innate access control features and work with APIs (application program interfaces) that easily fit your design criteria; there also are some products and programs that will challenge you to have custom interfaces developed. The same is true when you are designing a system from the ground up. The state of the available products requires purchasing from and perhaps working closely with a list of vendors. No single vendor is likely to have products to meet all of your design needs. Frequently your access control needs will require that end users be able to access OS-level services such as file space access and print spooling. Each OS (operating system) has innate access control mechanisms to enable an end user or other computer device to access services hosted on it. Likewise, NOSs (network operating systems) can be configured to grant access and use of network services and devices to end users who are identified, authenticated, and
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authorized. Built-in directory services are usually the vehicle that provides access controls to an OS or NOS. In other computer environments such as mainframes and large server applications, databases or simple access control list are the checkpoint for determining what services and applications a username is authorized to access. You can layer various levels of access controls. For example, you could require a login process (a username and password) first to get to the network services, and then require a username (which can be different from the login one) and password to access a particular host computer, followed by requiring a token card and PIN to access a confidential application on that host. At each step in the example, the access control barriers are innate services. The username would typically be stored in the network directory, with a password. The OS would similarly store the username (could be different) in the host OS directory, and the application controls would store a username or refer to a service directory and may also include a requirement to use a token card in an access control list on an AAA server. Current environments are often complicated, with a single user s access information stored in a directory or list in every device and application to which he may need access. The complexity contributes not only to an onus on systems administrators but to mistakes and access control failures as well. Meeting the access control objectives of the authorization process in a complex computing environment becomes a chase of details, usually orchestrated by a string of system, database, and application administrators. The details are sufficient in number to make this process subject to human errors and reliant on periodic housecleaning to keep the administration of the access controls current. Access control criteria relevant to keeping the data that directly impacts the financial reports is of particular interest because of the requirement to audit the adequacy of IT access controls and comment on it in public financial reports. This necessitates the management of public companies ensuring that the IT staffs have implemented adequate access controls. The level of control required moves the discussion to defining specific auditable connections between username access rights and specific data. The access controls to meet today s requirements must cause the entire IT system of an organization to become like a maze with automatic doors that open compartments of devices, data, or services only for authorized and properly authenticated usernames. This is illustrated in Figure 5-4. To the unauthorized username, the devices, data, or services do not exist they re totally blocked. Read-only users are presented with a glass window they can read through, but they cannot change the data. The controls must be able to turn the maze into a tunnel to one data element if that is all the username is permitted to see or change. To hackers, the maze would not even exist.