Pharmacovigilance in VS .NET

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Pharmacovigilance
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This project involved developing an online, Web-based system for medical workers to submit details of adverse reactions to drugs by their patients. It is part of the European Union s process of monitoring the safety and effectiveness of medication (Figs. 5.8 5.11).
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Figure 5.8 Pharmacovigilance story 6 card.
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5 Identifying Stories and Preparing to Build
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Figure 5.9 Reverse of the pharmacovigilance story 6 card.
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Figure 5.10 Pharmacovigilance story 10 card.
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5.2 Collections of Stories
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Reverse of the pharmacovigilance story 10 card.
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Stamps System
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This project was delivered to a client who ran a retail organization that sold rare and historic postage stamps to collectors (Figs. 5.12 5.15). Note that this story card in Fig. 5.13 is more complex than the previous ones as it also contains information about estimation of resources for the story. This is based on a more traditional software engineering approach to estimation that relied on identifying function points or object points in the story. This is a mechanism for trying to ascertain the complexity of a story in terms of what it does does it communicate with or query a database, is it simple piece of code or something that has some real challenges involved, and so on There is a considerable amount of data available about industrial projects that have been classi ed in this way, but this data may not provide a reliable answer for our needs here. We no longer record this information on a story card since it did not seem to provide suf cient value the estimates generated using this method were very inaccurate.
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5.2.3 DELTAH (Developing European Leadership Through Action-learning in Healthcare)
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This project is concerned with supporting leadership development activities for health service professionals (see http://www.deltah.org) (Figs. 5.16 5.18). We will see how this way of looking at things is both useful for planning out a program but also for testing it. It will be the basis for our system metaphor.
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5 Identifying Stories and Preparing to Build
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Figure 5.12 Stamps story 2 card.
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5.2 Collections of Stories
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Reverse of the stamps story 2 card.
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5 Identifying Stories and Preparing to Build
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Figure 5.14 Stamps story 5 card.
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5.2 Collections of Stories
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Reverse of the stamps story 5 card.
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5 Identifying Stories and Preparing to Build
Figure 5.16 DELTAH story 1 card.
5.2 Collections of Stories
DELTAH story 2 card.
5 Identifying Stories and Preparing to Build
Figure 5.18 DELTAH story 3 card.
5.3 User Interfaces
USER INTERFACES
Thus far, the concepts that we have discussed are oriented toward the needs of the developers; when it comes to communication with the customer, however, it is essential that we use ideas that he or she can understand. Many people look upon a software system from the perspective of how it presents itself to them. In other words, the system is the interface! People are all different and differ greatly in the way they think and behave when using a software system. The designers of a user interface would seem, therefore, to have an almost impossible task when it comes to trying to satisfy every possible user of the system. There is now a considerable amount of research and experience when it comes to this area. We will brie y review some of the commonly proposed principles that are recommended for the design of good graphical user interfaces (GUIs). Note, however, that if your client has some special factors, perhaps some of the users are handicapped in some way or have other special needs, then these will have to be investigated carefully and may result in some specialist features being incorporated in the interface. A useful general reference on user interface design is that of Schneiderman (1998). Most user interfaces consist of a collection of windows and screens. These have two main purposes: one is to present information to the use, the other is to permit the user to carry out some tasks. Naturally, many windows are a combination of both types. If we are presenting information, then there are some important principles that should be followed: (a) The information presented should not be confusing, contradictory, or misleading. (b) The words, icons, and other visual metaphors used should be clear and understandable; the use of obscure technical jargon should be avoided. (c) The screens should not be cluttered, full of irrelevant and distracting images and text, they should focus on the task in hand. (d) The information should be up to date and presented in a consistent manner. (e) If the user is expected to do something, it should be made clear what that is. If the window is designed to allow the user to carry out some task, then other important characteristics are desirable: (a) The action required to carry out the task should be clear; help should be given if appropriate. (b) Similar tasks under similar conditions should require similar actions. (c) Feedback should be given; if the operation was successful, then this should be clear to the user.