AGILITY: WHAT IS IT AND HOW DO WE ACHIEVE IT in Visual Studio .NET

Creating QR Code in Visual Studio .NET AGILITY: WHAT IS IT AND HOW DO WE ACHIEVE IT
1.3 AGILITY: WHAT IS IT AND HOW DO WE ACHIEVE IT
Recognizing QR Code In .NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for .NET framework Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in .NET applications.
When we embark on a software development project, the initial and some would say the hardest phase is that of determining the requirements nding out, with the client, what the proposed system is supposed to do. It might start with a brief overview of the business context and the identi cation of the kind of data that is to be involved, how this data is to be manipulated, and how
QR Maker In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in .NET framework applications.
1.3 Agility: What Is It and How Do We Achieve It
Recognize QR Code In .NET
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
these various activities mesh together with each other and with the other activities in the business. Many techniques exist to do this: Ways of collecting information, not just from the client but also from the intended users of the system, will be needed in this initial stage. Sifting through this information, making decisions about the relative importance of some of the information, and trying to set it into a coherent picture follow. Again, a number of different approaches, notations, and techniques exist to support this. Having achieved some indication of the overall purpose of the system, the way that it interfaces and interacts with other business processes will be the next issue. We are trying to establish the system boundary during this phase. From this we construct a detailed requirements document. Some examples of actual documents will be given in a later chapter. Such a document will be structured, typically, into functional requirements and non-functional requirements. Both are vitally important. Each requirement will be stated in English, perhaps structured into sections containing related requirements and described at various levels of detail. The client may well be satis ed at this point with what is proposed. However, it is always dif cult to visualize exactly how the system will work at this stage, and our understanding of it may not be right. Now we would embark on some analysis, looking at these key operational aspects, identifying the sort of computing resources needed to operate such a system and considering many other aspects of the proposed system. After analysis we get into the design phase, and it is here where we describe the data and processing models and how the system could be created from the available technical options. This stage is often lengthy and complicated. Rarely will the developers be able to proceed independently of the client although there may be pressure on them from managers to do so. There will be many issues that will arise during this process requiring further consultation with the client. This is often not carried out, and the developers start making decisions that only the client should take. We see the system starting to drift from what it should be. At the end of this process, we will have a large and complicated detailed design that may or may not still be valid in terms of the client s business needs, which may be evolving. If we go back to the client at this stage, we may very well nd that the business has moved on and the requirements have changed signi cantly. The traditional development methods, such as the waterfall method, cannot handle this challenge effectively. Because of the investment in the design, there may be a reluctance to change it signi cantly or to start again. The waterfall model envisions a steady and systematic sequence of stages starting with the capture and de nition of the requirements, the analysis of these requirements, the formalizing of a system and software design, the implementation of the design, and the testing of the software. Finally we have delivery and after-sales, which covers a number of different types of maintenance : perfective maintenance where faults are removed after delivery, adaptive maintenance, which might involve building more functionality in the system, and maintenance to upgrade the software to a different operating environment.
Draw Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
Scanning Bar Code In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Quick Response Code Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Make Code 3 Of 9 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
UPC-A Supplement 5 Creator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create UPCA image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Make Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Painting Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
GTIN - 13 Encoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in .NET applications.
UPCA Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in ASP.NET applications.