Problems with nested OUs in .NET framework

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Problems with nested OUs
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As I mentioned previously, you can create an OU hierarchy that is uncomplicated and one that includes many nested OUs. However, deeply nested OUs are usually a sign of a faulty OU design. As a general rule of thumb, you should only use first- and secondlevel OUs. When you begin creating OUs at the third level and beyond, a warning light should come on in your head. Third-level OUs (and deeply nested OUs) are usually a sign that your OU structure is growing too much or that your hierarchical design is not broad enough. This does not at all mean that third-level OUs and beyond should not be used. In fact, situations do arise where they are needed. But, the point I want to make here is simply that third-level OUs and beyond should cause you to pause and carefully examine your OU structure. Here s why: Deeply nested OUs can affect Group Policy. Group Policy is implemented at the site, domain, and OU levels. Deeply nested OUs may cause performance problems and user logon delays because of the filtering effect that must occur through the OU structure. Inheritance is in effect. This means that the parent OU passes its properties to the second-level OU, which passes its properties to the third-level OU, and so forth. With deeply nested and excessively complex OU structures, inheritance issues can be problematic both in terms of administration and performance.
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Part I Planning an Active Directory Deployment
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Active Directory resource discovery is slower in deeply nested OUs. To a point, complex OU structures cause more problems than they solve. Remember that an OU structure should support your administrative needs not user browsing. Complex structures can cause more problems than they solve and tend to become more confusing than helpful.
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Planning Your Organizational Unit Structure
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Just as you should carefully plan your domain structure, you should carefully plan your OU structure. Due to the issues explored in the previous section, you should attempt to use the simplest OU structure possible, always focusing on administration. Just like your domain structure, simplicity is your best choice. Keep your OUs broad so they serve a general purpose. Highly specific OU structures grow at an alarming rate and can get completely out of hand, so keep things as simple as possible. Your OU structure should also be relatively static. This means that your OUs should be based on network or business divisions that are not likely to change. OUs that are not built on static network or business divisions must be restructured or deleted, thus causing you to move Active Directory objects from one OU to another. This can be time consuming and frustrating, so keep your OUs as static as possible. As you plan your OU structure, take a close look at your administrative model and your actual IT staff. Consider the following questions: How can my OU structure support and simplify my administrative model How can my OU structure fulfill my administrative model How will my IT staff manage OUs How can my OU model be generated so that it makes effective use of my IT staff As you consider OUs, think about these issues so that you implement the best plan to support administration.
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When planning OUs, always keep your attention focused on your administrative model do not begin to think about resources and user access to those resources based on browsing.
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There is no single correct way to design an OU structure. Microsoft leaves that to you and your network/administrative needs. Since there is no single correct way, you have a few different options available to you, plus a mixture of these and possibly a design that you create yourself. The main point is that your OU structure should be simple, static, and should benefit administration.
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