Part IV Integrating Supporting Technologies in Visual Studio .NET

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Part IV Integrating Supporting Technologies
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Under Administrative Templates, you also have categories for the following: Start Menu & Task Bar This enables you to configure Start Menu and taskbar items. Desktop This enables you to control desktop settings including the Active Desktop as well as Active Directory searches. Control Panel This enables you to manage and control Control Panel items.
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This chapter explored Microsoft s approach to computer and user management in Windows 2000 through IntelliMirror and specifically through the Active Directory. In order to reduce the TCO, organizations must control user and computer settings in order to create the most productive work environment and avoid help desk trouble tickets. IntelliMirror technologies can provide highly customized management configuration, including remote installation and software deployment. These features enable network and system streamlining that can enforce and implement company policies.
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Implementing Distributed File System and Indexing Service
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hen the concept of networking first came onto the scene, networks were rather small in terms of servers, workstations, and geographic area. Network users could more easily locate resources because network size or server number was not a hindrance. In today s large distributed networks, where it is not uncommon for a network to span multiple geographic locations around the world and contain thousands of users and servers, users often struggle when attempting to locate a particular resource. The Active Directory is designed to reduce this problem by giving users powerful query capabilities and removing the network topology from the users view. There are two other technologies, Distributed File System and Indexing Service, that also further the Active Directory s cause by making shared folders more easy to locate and improving user text searches. This chapter explores these two technologies and how they can be useful in your Active Directory environment.
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Exploring Distributed File System Configuring Distributed File System Exploring and configuring Indexing Service Managing the Indexing Service
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Understanding Distributed File System (Dfs)
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Picture this scenario: A network user needs to find a shared folder that contains a group of spreadsheet templates. The user knows the folder exists, but does not know the name of the shared folder or the computer on which the shared folder
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Part IV Integrating Supporting Technologies
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resides. What can the user do Before the Active Directory and Dfs, the user could only begin browsing the network and hope he or she found the right folder. In a large network, this task is essentially overwhelming. Distributed File System is a server service that attempts to take the mystery out of finding shared folders and is a system that I believe is quite good. It is easy to set up and configure, and it greatly simplifies the work of an end user. Distributed File System works by having one or more servers configured for Dfs. You set up shared folder links in a hierarchy fashion on the server. The shared folders themselves still reside on other computers and servers, but the Dfs server provides an internal link to the real network location. When users view the Dfs hierarchy, they simply see an organized list of shared folders as if the entire network s shared folders reside on one server. In reality, when a user opens a shared folder in the Dfs hierarchy, the user is actually redirected to the server that physically holds the shared folder. That server determines if the user has appropriate permissions to access the folder and returns the share results to the user. So, in essence, the Dfs acts as a server that provides an organized view of the shared folders and an internal link to the actual server that holds the actual folder. All of this is invisible to the end user who simply sees the shared folders as if they physically reside in one location. Figure 16-1 gives you a graphical view of this discussion. In Figure 16-1, you see a folder hierarchy called Sales. Within Sales, you see a number of shared folders pertaining to the Sales department. Users simply see Sales and all of its shared folders. In reality, the shared folders exist on three different servers. With Dfs, users do not have to keep track of the actual location of the shared folders or which server holds which shared folder. Of course, keeping track of 3 servers would not be hard in the real world, but suppose there were 40 sales folders spread out over 25 servers in different network sites. In conjunction with Figure 16-1, now is a good time to introduce some Dfs terms to you. First, a Dfs starts with a root. In Figure 16-1, the Sales folder is the root and what is initially visible to network users. When users open the root share, they see the other shared folders available. In your Dfs implementation, you can have as many Dfs roots as you desire, but the trick is that each Dfs server can hold only one Dfs root. You ll see some examples of this in upcoming sections in this chapter. Under each Dfs root, you have Dfs links. In Figure 16-1, each of the sales folders is actually a Dfs link to the actual server that holds the share. Figure 16-2 redraws the figure to show the root and Dfs links. In Figure 16-2, the links are shown as UNC paths to the correct server and share for discussion s sake. In reality, the link would be the full DNS name in a pure Windows 2000 network.
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