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outlet = 214 or zip_code = 94403 product like 'WebLogic%' and version > 45
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The body of the message can be any of the following types: Body Type Stream
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Description A stream of Java primitive values Name/value pairs, where the name is a string and the value is a primitive Java type Plain text (type string) A single serializable Java object, or a collection of objects if usingJDK 12+ A stream of uninterrupted bytes
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JMS does not have a specific XML message type, so such a message would be sent as a text message
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After learning all this about JMS, the Wonder Troops found the FTP model to be a natural fit to send orders from the Operation Center to the corresponding outlets Not only did it seem natural but also quite simple and more solid then the current fax method The e-mail method used by E-Pizza was good, but a system based on JMS could be extended to send messages back from the outlet to the central location As you might remember, the outlets send inventory information at the end of the day related to the walk-in orders Because of this they decide to use JMS FTP for communication between the Operations Center and the outlets The initial experiment is based on sending an order to the corresponding outlet To do this they will require a programmatic or fat client on the outlet This client will contain the message consumer and logic to present the order in the outlet As it is an experiment, it will only display the order for now Obviously, it is critical for the operation of the Pizza2Go outlets to receive all the orders, so it is decided to use the Guaranteed Message Delivery feature This way they can be sure that the order will eventually get to the outlet However, because an outlet can go offline and not connect with the central location in a decent period of time, they also decide to use the JMSReplyTo feature, so that every time the outlet receives an order an acknowledgement is sent back to the Operations Center This way they know whether the outlet has received the order and also what time the order was received This particular experiment is relatively simple Just replace the function that prints the fax with a call to a JMS producer that will create a message for the specified outlet and will consume a reply from the outlet The outlet has a client that consumes the message and sends a reply back to the producer The next order of business is deciding the type of message Here we find another confrontation between Mrs Chief Architect and Mr Senior Developer Thinking of the future, she wants to use XML to describe a customer order An example of a line item in an XML based order would be:
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<order-detail> <detail-type> pre-defined pizza </detail-type> <pizza> <pizza-name> Margherita </pizza-name> <pizza-size> Large </pizza-size> <dough> Classic </dough> </pizza> <quantity> 3 </guantity> </order-detail>
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In essence the whole order would be represented in XML using a syntax defined by the Wonder Troops that would enable them to represent an order This XML based order would then be sent to the outlet as a text type message This message would then have to be parsed and converted to something that could be used by the client-side application Mr Senior Developer does not particularly want to complicate issues by having to modify the order into XML, which later has to be specially parsed and processed at the receiving end Additionally, he abhors the aesthetics of an unbelievable amount of <tag> and </tag> pairs which make the text almost unreadable The simplicity of just sending an object down the wire and letting WebLogic deal with all the transport issues seems unbeatable
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This time the argument is won by Mr Senior Developer It was not possible to justify the additional time in creating an XML syntax for describing an order and all the coding associated with processing it The general feeling of the troops was that XML was better suited for communicating with external systems, such as the ones used for Business to Business (B2B) where the different partners do not have full control of the systems outside their company or the clients are non-Java For this purpose XML is well suited XML provides the grammar, but the parties using it have to agree on the words to be used and their meaning For example, what one company calls customers another calls clients In a message these two words are different This is where efforts such a BizTalk from Microsoft, ebXML, and RosettaNet are focusing on defining a business language based on the XML grammar that all parties can agree on As all the information contained in the order comes from objects, the easiest thing to do is to use a message type object This object will be a hash table that is composed of the Customer JavaBean, which contains all the information associated to the customer, the destination outlet number, the OrderMaster JavaBean and a vector with all the OrderDetail JavaBeans included in the order The next order of business is to design the actual queue architecture The issue to consider here is whether there should be one queue per outlet or a single queue for all the outlets Whereas at first it might seem more efficient to have one queue per outlet, in reality it is not so Queues are expensive resources and having many of them can have a negative impact on performance If one single queue for all the outlets is used, then all that has to be done is to define the outlet number as a message property This way the message selectors of every message consumer (the actual outlet) can check if the message matches their outlet, in which case the message is sent down the wire to the corresponding outlet The architecture is simple, but one thing has to be pointed out At first glance it seems as if there will be only one producer and as many consumers as outlets But, since the producer is a session bean, there will be as many producers as session beans are instantiated This is not a problem in itself, as every instance will have its own connection and session, but it is important to understand that this is happening
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