After that's set up, you have valid values in both SS and SP, and you can begin using the stack in Visual Studio .NET

Creation QR Code 2d barcode in Visual Studio .NET After that's set up, you have valid values in both SS and SP, and you can begin using the stack
After that's set up, you have valid values in both SS and SP, and you can begin using the stack
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You can place data onto the stack in numerous ways, but the most straightforward way involves a trio of related machine instructions, PUSH, PUSHF, and PUSHA The three are similar in how they work, and differ as to what they push onto the stack PUSHF pushes the Flags register onto the stack PUSHA pushes all eight of the 16-bit general-purpose registers PUSH pushes a 16-bit register or memory value that is specified by you in your source code, like so: PUSHF PUSHA PUSHAD PUSH AX PUSH [BX] PUSH DI PUSH ES ; ; ; ; ; ; ; Push Push Push Push Push Push Push the Flags register AX, CX, DX, BX, SP, BP, SI, and DI, in that order, all at once EAX, ECX, EDX, EBX, ESP, ESP, EBP, ESI, and EDI, all at once the AX register the word stored in memory at DS:BX the DI register the ES register
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Note that PUSHF takes no operands You'll generate an assembler error if you try to hand it an operand; PUSHF pushes the flags and that's all it is capable of doing PUSH and PUSHF work this way: First SP is decremented by one word (two bytes) so that it points to an empty area of the stack segment that is two bytes long Then whatever is to be pushed onto the stack is written to memory in the stack segment at the offset address in SP Voila! The data is safe on the stack, and SP has crawled two bytes closer to SS We call the word of memory pointed to by SP the top of the stack PUSHA works the same way, except that it pushes eight 16-bit registers at once, thus using 16 bytes of stack space at one swoop One thing to remember is that PUSHA is a newer instruction that doesn't exist on the 8086 and 8088 It first appeared with the 286 PUSHAD was added with the 386, and it pushes all eight 32-bit general-purpose registers onto the stack in one blow All memory between SP's initial position and its current position (the top of the stack) contains real data that was explicitly pushed on the stack and will presumably be fetched from the stack (we say popped from the stack) later on In real mode segmented model, the stack exists in a separate segment, and memory between SS and SP is considered free and available and is used to store new data that is to be pushed onto the stack This is not the case in real mode flat model, where the stack shares the same segment that everything else in the program is using What can and cannot be pushed onto the stack is complicated and depends on what CPU you're using None of the x86 CPUs can push 8-bit registers onto the stack You can't push AL or BH or any other of the 8-bit registers Segment registers and 32-bit extended general-purpose registers can be pushed in real mode,
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assuming you have a 386 or later CPU Similarly, immediate data can be pushed onto the stack, but only if you have a 286 or later CPU Keeping track of all this used to be a problem, but you're unlikely to be running code on CPUs earlier than the 386 these days Your morbid curiosity may be wondering what happens when SP runs out of room in its downward crawl and collides with SS Nothing good, certainly it depends heavily on how your program is laid out but I would lay money on your program crashing hard and possibly taking the system down with it (If you're working in a DOS box under Windows NT you at least won't crash the operating system All bets are off for Windows 9x!) Stack crashes are serious business, at least in part because there is only one stack in action at a time in real mode It's a little hard to explain (especially at this stage in our discussion), but this means that the stack you set up for your own program must be large enough to support as well the needs of DOS and any interruptdriven code (typically in the BIOS) that may be active while your program is running Even if you don't fully understand how someone else may be using your program's stack at the same time you are, give those other guys some extra room and keep an eye on the proximity of SS and SP while you trace a program in DEBUG
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