Cache-Control specifies that the response be classified as in Java

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Cache-Control specifies that the response be classified as
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public: Client or intermediary (shared) cache can attempt to cache the response private: Only client can cache the response no-cache: Client and intermediary cache(s) should not cache the response no-store: Intermediate caches (private and shared) can't store document text for
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security reasons max-age: Maximum age of the document (used with calculated age) s-maxage: Overrides max-age, but only for a shared cache must-revalidate: Requires clients to always revalidate their cached copy proxy-revalidate: Same as must-validate, but applies only to intermediate shared proxy caches
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As an example, we can limit the caching of foohtml from examplecom to client caches and set Cache-Control as follows:
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HTTP/11 200 OK Cache-Control: private
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This prevents intermediate caches from storing the response, but allows the client's private cache to do so This is a reasonable way to encourage both security and performance Notice that I say "encourage" in no way do these techniques enforce security Unless encrypted, documents that pass through intermediaries are always subject to RFC violations and possible tracking or rebroadcast There are a number of other parameters to the Cache-Control field that have to do with requests, but since these are actually important for security or in relation to the implementation of
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an intermediary cache, we won't address them here If you're interested, Section 149 of RFC 2616 makes for interesting reading
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Connection Management
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Earlier, we discussed the semantics of HTTP Recall that a single HTTP connection using TCP can require two roundtrips: one to establish the connection and one to transfer the content The designers of HTTP 10 and 11 realized early on that this was going to be a problem As the popularity of the Web grew and Web pages and sites became more complex, with lots of graphics, it became clear that the number of HTTP connections generated at any one time was going to raise major scalability and bandwidth issues What's more, there seemed to be a lot of waste in the process of transferring Web objects composed of even a single page For example, when a user connected to a single logical Web page, such as http://wwwcnncom, separate HTTP connections were required for downloading the page, each image, and any applets Given that a user had already established a connection with cnncom, couldn't there be some batch-style transfer To remedy this situation, protocol designers came up with the notion of persistent connections The initial idea was to leverage the TCP connection already established with a server to transfer other objects associated with the site or page To understand how this feature improves performance, consider what happens when a user has to download any Web page that includes several embedded objects (eg, images or graphics), such as the one shown in Figure 5-4 Suppose that, in addition to the basic HTML for this page, there are some 50 images embedded within Figure 5-4 A Web page with several embedded images
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Without persistent connections, Web browsers would use one HTTP connection to fetch the HTML page and then one for each image, leading to a rough total of
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With persistent connections, this could be reduced to
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The practical effect of this difference is noticeable Let's assume that the total content required to transfer this page (including images) is about 75 K, that it takes 100 ms to transfer the content, and that it takes 15 ms to send a packet between our client and the sample Web site (the RTT is thus 30 ms) This means that the total transfer time for both scenarios will be
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102 15 + 100 = 1630 ms without persistent connections 52 15 + 100 = 880 ms with persistent connections
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By using persistent connections, we've reduced the transfer rate about 50 percent Convincing, isn't it In addition to better end-to-end transfer times, there are a number of other advantages to persistent connections, among them:
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Less CPU and memory demand of routers and servers (fewer TCP connections) Less bandwidth required to transfer a set of related objects (ie, a Web page plus its images) Better network congestion control as more time is given to an established TCP connection, the built-in congestion control features of TCP have more time to improve overall network throughput
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Support for persistent connections actually started in HTTP 10 with use of the Keep-Alive header By constructing an HTTP request that included Keep-Alive, HTTP 10 clients could request that the connection be persistent However, it was discovered that the Keep-Alive approach led to undesirable effects when proxy servers existed on the client/server path HTTP 11 doesn't use the Keep-Alive approach Instead, its exchanges assume that all connections are kept persistent unless the server or client explicitly indicates otherwise For example, a server can close a connection by including the following in its response header:
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