Self-Test Exercises in Software

Drawing ECC200 in Software Self-Test Exercises
Self-Test Exercises
ECC200 Generator In C#
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in .NET applications.
5 What unfortunate misinterpretation can occur with the following declaration
Encode DataMatrix In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in ASP.NET applications.
int* intPtr1, intPtr2;
Data Matrix ECC200 Creation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in VS .NET applications.
6 Suppose a dynamic variable were created as follows:
Printing Data Matrix In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
char *p; p = new char;
Generate Bar Code In Visual C#
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET applications.
Pointers
Code39 Encoder In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in VS .NET applications.
Assuming that the value of the pointer variable p has not changed (so it still points to the same dynamic variable), how can you destroy this new dynamic variable and return the memory it uses to the freestore manager so that the memory can be reused to create other new dynamic variables 7 Write a definition for a type called NumberPtr that will be the type for pointer variables that hold pointers to dynamic variables of type double Also, write a declaration for a pointer variable called myPoint, which is of type NumberPtr 8 Describe the action of the new operator What does the new operator return What are the indications of errors
Decode EAN / UCC - 13 In VS .NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
TYPE DEFINITIONS
Read Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode reader for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
You can assign a name to a type definition and then use the type name to declare variables This is done with the keyword typedef These type definitions are normally placed outside the body of the main part of your program and outside the body of other functions, typically near the start of a file That way the typedef is global and available to your entire program We will use type definitions to define names for pointer types, as shown in the example below
Drawing Code 128 Code Set B In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Java applications.
SYNTAX
Code 39 Full ASCII Creator In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in Java applications.
typedef Known_Type_Definition New_Type_Name;
GTIN - 128 Creator In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create EAN 128 image in Java applications.
EXAMPLE
Code 128 Code Set B Drawer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in .NET applications.
typedef int* IntPtr;
Encoding Code128 In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in ASP.NET applications.
The type name IntPtr can then be used to declare pointers to dynamic variables of type int, as in the following example:
Code 128B Decoder In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
IntPtr pointer1, pointer2;
Create Data Matrix In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
Pitfall
EAN-13 Creation In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in ASP.NET applications.
POINTERS
Decode UPC-A Supplement 2 In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
CALL-BY-VALUE PARAMETERS
Bar Code Creation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
When a call-by-value parameter is of a pointer type, its behavior can occasionally be subtle and troublesome Consider the function call shown in Display 104 The parameter temp in the function sneaky is a call-by-value parameter, and hence it is a local variable When the function is called, the value of temp is set to the value of the argument p and the function body is executed Since temp is a local variable, no changes to temp should go outside the function sneaky In particular, the value of the pointer variable p should not be changed Yet the sample dialogue makes it look like the value of the pointer variable p has changed Before the call to the function sneaky, the value of *p was 77, and after the call to sneaky the value of *p is 99 What has happened
Create Code 128 Code Set B In C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in .NET framework applications.
Pointers and Dynamic Arrays
Encoding Bar Code In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
The situation is diagrammed in Display 105 Although the sample dialogue may make it look as if p were changed, the value of p was not changed by the function call to sneaky Pointer p has two things associated with it: p s pointer value and the value stored where p points But the value of p is the pointer (that is, a memory address) After the call to sneaky, the variable p contains the same pointer value (that is, the same memory address) The call to sneaky has changed the value of the variable pointed to by p, but it has not changed the value of p itself If the parameter type is a class or structure type that has member variables of a pointer type, the same kind of surprising changes can occur with call-by-value arguments of the class type However, for class types, you can avoid (and control) these surprise changes by defining a copy constructor, as described later in this chapter
Display 104 A Call-by-Value Pointer Parameter (part 1 of 2)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 //Program to demonstrate the way call-by-value parameters //behave with pointer arguments #include <iostream> using std::cout; using std::cin; using std::endl; typedef int* IntPointer; void sneaky(IntPointer temp); int main( ) { IntPointer p; p = new int; *p = 77; cout << "Before call to function *p == " << *p << endl; sneaky(p); cout << "After call to function *p == " << *p << endl; return 0; }